Does resection of adrenal metastases from non-small cell lung cancer improve survival?

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Abstract

Background. Metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) carries a dismal prognosis, which is minimally affected by chemotherapy. Solitary brain metastases from NSCLC have been resected with 5-year survivals of 10% to 30%. The objective of this study was to determine if resection of isolated adrenal metastases improves survival. Methods. Isolated adrenal metastases were found in 14 patients with NSCLC. Eight patients had resection after cis-platinum-based chemotherapy, and 6 received chemotherapy alone. Results. Median survival in the surgical group was significantly greater than that in the chemotherapy group (31 versus 8.5 months; p = 0.03). All patients in the chemotherapy group were dead by 22 months. Three year actuarial survival in the surgical group was 38%. No difference in locoregional stage, size of adrenal metastases, patient age, or performance status was present between the two groups. Conclusions. Long-term disease-free survival is possible after resection of isolated adrenal metastases from NSCLC. Resection of isolated adrenal metastases should be considered if the primary NSCLC is resectable.

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Luketich, J. D., & Burt, M. E. (1996). Does resection of adrenal metastases from non-small cell lung cancer improve survival? Annals of Thoracic Surgery, 62(6), 1614–1616. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0003-4975(96)00611-X

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