Results of operation without adjuvant therapy in the treatment of small cell lung cancer

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Abstract

The role of surgery in the treatment of small cell lung cancer remains a subject of debate. We carried out a retrospective review of 87 patients with small cell lung cancer referred to one surgeon for staging and treatment. Thirty patients (34.5%) were deemed suitable for thoracotomy. Fourteen patients had stage I disease, 5 patients had stage II disease, and 11 patients had stage III disease. Twenty-eight of the 30 patients (93.3%) went on to have surgical resection. The actual overall 5-year survival in all patients who underwent thoracotomy was 43.3%. The actual 5-year survival for patients in stages I and III was 57.1% and 55.5%, respectively. No patients with stage II disease survived 5 years. We conclude that there is a small group of patients with small cell lung cancer in whom, with careful preoperative staging, the prospects of cure by operation are similar to those with non-small lung cancer. © 1992.

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Shah, S. S., Thompson, J., & Goldstraw, P. (1992). Results of operation without adjuvant therapy in the treatment of small cell lung cancer. The Annals of Thoracic Surgery, 54(3), 498–501. https://doi.org/10.1016/0003-4975(92)90442-7

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