The role of perceptual learning on modality-specific visual attentional effects

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Abstract

Morrone et al. [Morrone, M. C., Denti, V., & Spinelli, D. (2002). Color and luminance contrasts attract independent attention. Current Biology, 12, 1134-1137] reported that the detrimental effect on contrast discrimination thresholds of performing a concomitant task is modality specific: performing a secondary luminance task has no effect on colour contrast thresholds, and vice versa. Here we confirm this result with a novel task involving learning of spatial position, and go on to show that it is not specific to the cardinal colour axes: secondary tasks with red-green stimuli impede performance on a blue-yellow task and vice versa. We further show that the attentional effect can be abolished with continued training over 2-4 training days (2-20 training sessions), and that the effect of learning is transferable to new target positions. Given the finding of transference, we discuss the possibility that V4 is a site of plasticity for both stimulus types, and that the separation is due to a luminance-colour separation within this cortical area. © 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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Chirimuuta, M., Burr, D., & Morrone, M. C. (2007). The role of perceptual learning on modality-specific visual attentional effects. Vision Research, 47(1), 60–70. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.visres.2006.09.002

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