Salmonella L-forms: Formation in human bile invitro and isolation culture from patients' gallbladder samples by a non-high osmotic isolation technique

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Abstract

Bacterial L-forms have always been considered as osmotic-pressure-sensitive cell-wall-deficient bacteria and isolation culture of L-forms must use media with high osmotic pressure. However, isolation culture of stable L-forms formed in humans and animals is very difficult because they have adapted to the physiological osmotic pressure condition of the host. We use a non-high osmotic isolation technique to isolate stable L-forms of Salmonella Typhi and Salmonella Paratyphi A from bile-inducer cultures invitro and from patients' gallbladder specimens. Multiplex PCR assay for Salmonella-specific genes and nucleotide sequencing are used to identify the Salmonella L-forms in stable L-form isolates. Using this method, we confirmed that Salmonella Paratyphi A and Salmonella Typhi cannot be isolated from bile-inducer cultures cultured for 6h or 48h, but the L-forms can be isolated from 1h to 45 days. In the 524 gallbladder samples, the positive rate for bacterial forms was 19.7% and the positive rate for Salmonella spp. was 0.6% by routine bacteriological methods. The positive rate for bacterial L-forms was 75.4% using non-high osmotic isolation culture. In the L-form isolates, the positive rate of Salmonella invA gene was 3.1%. In these invA-positive L-form isolates, four were positive for the invA and flic-d genes of Salmonella Typhi, and ten were positive for the invA and flic-a genes of Salmonella Paratyphi A.

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Wang, D. N., Wu, W. J., Wang, T., Pan, Y. Z., Tang, K. L., She, X. L., … Wang, H. (2015). Salmonella L-forms: Formation in human bile invitro and isolation culture from patients’ gallbladder samples by a non-high osmotic isolation technique. Clinical Microbiology and Infection, 21(5), 470.e9-470.e16. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cmi.2014.12.016

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