Scientific molecular basis for treatment of reproductive failure in the human: An insight into the future

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Abstract

Purpose. The purpose of this review is to summarize science-based new treatments for human reproductive failure and future developments. Results. First will be discussed popular but erroneous myths of current non-science based treatments. Then will be discussed new treatments and their scientific base, including ovary and egg freezing, and transplantation to preserve fertility in young women undergoing gonadotoxic chemotherapy and radiation for cancer; new perspectives on human epididymal sperm maturation based on a comparison between ICSI (intracytoplasmic sperm injection) with testis sperm versus epididymal sperm; simplifying IVF and reducing cost by more intelligent and milder ovarian stimulation; improving pregnancy rate in older women; searching the genome to find genes which control spermatogenesis and whose deletion or mutation causes spermatogenic failure; and human spermatogenic stem cell culture to treat azoospermia, and to preserve fertility in pre-pubertal boys undergoing cancer treatment. Conclusion. With stem cell biology and molecular understanding of reproductive failure, new therapies for previously untreatable infertility are currently on the near horizon. Conversely our clinical results with new therapeutic approaches are adding to our understanding of the basic science of reproduction. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Molecular Genetics of Human Reproductive Failure. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

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Silber, S. J., & Barbey, N. (2012, December). Scientific molecular basis for treatment of reproductive failure in the human: An insight into the future. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Molecular Basis of Disease. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbadis.2012.10.004

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