Sensitivity considerations in polarization transfer and filtering using dipole-dipole couplings: Implications for biomineral systems

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Abstract

The robustness and sensitivities of different polarization-transfer methods that exploit heteronuclear dipole-dipole couplings are compared for a series of heterogeneous solid systems, including polycrystalline tetrakis(trimethylsilyl)silane (TKS), adamantane, a physical mixture of doubly 13C,15N-enriched and singly 13C-enriched polycrystalline glycine, and a powder sample of siliceous marine diatoms, Thalossiosira pseudonana. The methods were analyzed according to their respective frequency-matching spectra or resultant signal intensities. For a series of 13C{1H} cross-polarization experiments, adiabatic passage Hartmann-Hahn cross-polarization (APHH-CP) was shown to have several advantages over other methods, including Hartmann-Hahn cross-polarization (HHCP), variable-amplitude cross-polarization (VACP), and ramped-amplitude cross-polarization (RACP). For X-Y systems, such as 13C{15N}, high and comparable sensitivities were obtained by using APHH-CP with Lee-Goldburg decoupling or by using the transferred-echo double resonance (TEDOR) experiment. The findings were applied to multinuclear 1H, 13C, 15N, and 29Si CP MAS characterization of a powder diatom sample, a challenging inorganic-organic hybrid solid that places high demands on NMR signal sensitivity. © 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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Christiansen, S. C., Hedin, N., Epping, J. D., Janicke, M. T., Del Amo, Y., Demarest, M., … Chmelka, B. F. (2006). Sensitivity considerations in polarization transfer and filtering using dipole-dipole couplings: Implications for biomineral systems. Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, 29(1–3), 170–182. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ssnmr.2005.10.010

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