Serologic evidence of various arboviruses detected in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in the United States

7Citations
Citations of this article
11Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

© 2017 by The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) are an abundant mammal with a wide geographic distribution in the United States, which make them good sentinels for monitoring arboviral activity across the country. Exposure to various arboviruses has been detected in white-tailed deer, typically in conjunction with another diagnostic finding. To better assess the exposure of white-tailed deer to seven arboviruses, wetested 1,508 sera collected from 2010 to 2016 for antibodies to eastern equine encephalitis (2.5%), Powassan (4.2%), St. Louis encephalitis, (3.7%), West Nile (6.0%), Maguari (19.4%), La Crosse (30.3%), and blu etongue (7.8%) viruses. At least one arbovirus was detected in 51.3%, and exposure to more than one arbovirus was identified in 17.6% of the white-tailed deer sampled.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Pedersen, K., Wang, E., Weaver, S. C., Wolf, P. C., Randall, A. R., Van Why, K. R., … Gidlewski, T. (2017). Serologic evidence of various arboviruses detected in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in the United States. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 97(2), 319–323. https://doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.17-0180

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free