Serum erythropoietin level predicts the prognosis of chronic heart failure with or without anemia

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to explore the correlation of erythropoietin (EPO) with N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) or CHF complicated with anemia, in addition to its correlation with the prognosis of the patient. A total of 217 CHF patients were enrolled in this study. The patients were graded according to the cardiac function criteria of the New York Heart Association (NYHA). The serum EPO, NT-proBNP and hs-CRP levels of the patients were determined. The patients were followed up for ≥24 months. The EPO expression level in patients with NYHA II-IV CHF was significantly higher compared with that in the control group (P<0.05). EPO expression increased with the aggravation of CHF, exhibiting significant differences amongst the various NYHA graded groups (P<0.05). The EPO expression level increased significantly with an increase in NHA grade in addition to the severity of the anemia in the patients with CHF complicated by anemia (P<0.05). In the patients who succumbed (mortality group), the expression level of EPO was significantly higher and the hemoglobin level was significantly lower compared with those of the survival group (P<0.05). The EPO expression levels were elevated in CHF patients and patients with CHF and anemia. The level of expression correlated positively with the severity of CHF as well as that of anemia. Serum EPO measurements were successful in predicting the mortality and re-hospitalization rates of CHF patients at the end point, within two years of follow-up.

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Ling, G., Wang, A. H., Sun, Y. L., Lin, L., & Xu, C. E. (2013). Serum erythropoietin level predicts the prognosis of chronic heart failure with or without anemia. Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine, 6(5), 1327–1331. https://doi.org/10.3892/etm.2013.1307

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