Short-term heat shock affects host-virus interaction in mice infected with highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1

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Abstract

Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) H5N1 is a highly<br />contagious virus that can cause acute respiratory infections and high<br />human fatality ratio due to excessive inflammatory response. Short-term<br />heat shock, as a stressful condition, could induce the expression of<br />heat shock proteins that function as molecular chaperones to protect<br />cells against multiple stresses. However, the protective effect of<br />short-term heat shock in influenza infection is far from being<br />understood. In this study, mice were treated at 39 degrees C for 4 h<br />before being infected with HPAIV H5N1. Interestingly, short-term heat<br />shock significantly increased the levels of HSP70 and pro-inflammatory<br />cytokines IL-6, INF-alpha, IFN-beta, and IFN-gamma in the lung tissues<br />of mice. Following HPAIV H5N1 infection, short-term heat shock<br />alleviated immunopathology and viral replication in lung tissue and<br />repressed the weight loss and increased the survival rate of<br />H5N1-infected mice. Our data reported that short-term heat shock<br />provided beneficial anti-HPAIV H5N1 properties in mice model, which<br />offers an alternative strategy for non-drug prevention for influenza<br />infection.

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Xue, J., Fan, X., Yu, J., Zhang, S., Xiao, J., Hu, Y., & Wang, M. (2016). Short-term heat shock affects host-virus interaction in mice infected with highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1. Frontiers in Microbiology, 7(JUN). https://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2016.00924

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