Signal intensities in preoperative mri do not reflect proliferative activity in Meningioma

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Identification of high-grade meningiomas in preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is important for optimized surgical strategy and best possible resection. Numerous studies investigated subjectively determined morphological features as predictors of tumor biology in meningiomas. The aim of this study was to identify the predictive value of more reliable, quantitatively measured signal intensities in MRI for differentiation of high- and lowgrade meningiomas and identification of meningiomas with high proliferation rates, respectively. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Sixty-six patients (56 World Health Organization[WHO] grade I, 9 WHO grade II, and 1 WHO grade I) were included in the study. Preoperative MRI signal intensities (fluid-attenuated inversion recovery[FLAIR], T1 precontrast, and T1 postcontrast as genuine and normalized values) were correlatedwithKi-67expressionintissue sections of resected meningiomas. Differences between the groups (analysis of variance) and Spearman rho correlation were computed using SPSS 22. RESULTS: Mean values of genuine signal intensities of meningiomas in FLAIR, T1 native, and T1 postcontrast were 323.9 ± 59, 332.8 ± 67.9, and 768.5 ± 165.3. Mean values of normalized (to the contralateral white matter) signal intensities of meningiomas in FLAIR, T1 native, and T1 postcontrast were 1.5 ± 0.3, 0.8 ± 0.1, and 1.9 ± 0.4. There was no significant correlation between MRI signal intensities and WHO grade or Ki-67 expression. Signal intensities did not differ significantly between WHO grade I and II/III meningiomas. Ki-67 expression was significantly increased in high-grade meningiomas compared with low-grade meningiomas (P < 0.01). Objectively measured values of MRI signal intensities (FLAIR, T1 precontrast, and T1 postcontrast enhancement) did not distinguish between high-grade and low-grade meningiomas. Furthermore, there was no association between MRI signal intensities and Ki-67 expression representing proliferative activity.

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Schob, S., Frydrychowicz, C., Gawlitza, M., Bure, L., Preuß, M., Hoffmann, K. T., & Surov, A. (2016). Signal intensities in preoperative mri do not reflect proliferative activity in Meningioma. Translational Oncology, 9(4), 274–279. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tranon.2016.05.003

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