Simulated solar irradiation with enhanced UV-B adjust plastid- and thylakoid-associated polyamine changes for UV-B protection

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Abstract

Polyamines have been described to protect against numerous oxidative stresses in plants. Increasing UV-B radiation (280-315 nm) in the biosphere may also induce an increase in radical formation in tissues. This study employed the tobacco cultivars Bel B and Bel W3 to describe possible protective functions of polyamines against UV-B radiation in sun light simulators (GSF/Munich) with natural diurnal fluctuations of simulated UV-B. Polyamine measurements on a whole leaf basis in isolated chloroplasts and thylakoids were paralleled to photosynthetic and respiration rates, photosynthetic efficiency, leaf thickness and photosynthetic pigment compositions. The study revealed that an increase of polyamines, and especially of putrescine level in thylakoid membranes upon elevated UV-B exposure comprises one of the primary protective mechanisms in the photosynthetic apparatus of the tobacco variety Bel B against UV-B radiation. The tobacco cultivar Bel W3, sensitive to ozone, was also proved to be sensitive to UV-B. This sensitivity is attributed to its incapability to enhance putrescine level in thylakoid membranes. After prolongation of UV-B exposure, when endogenous plant balances are being gradually restored, due to secondary responses, (e.g., biosynthesis of carotenoids and of additional flavonoids) and the plant is adapting to the altered environmental conditions, then the polyamine level is being reduced. Thus, we can discriminate the UV-B induced stress period from a UV-B acclimation period. © 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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APA

Lütz, C., Navakoudis, E., Seidlitz, H. K., & Kotzabasis, K. (2005). Simulated solar irradiation with enhanced UV-B adjust plastid- and thylakoid-associated polyamine changes for UV-B protection. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Bioenergetics, 1710(1), 24–33. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbabio.2005.09.001

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