Stereoacuity after photorefractive keratectomy in myopia

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Abstract

Purpose: Stereopsis, as a part of visual function, is the ability of differentiating between the two eyes' views (binocular disparity), due to the eyes' different positions. The aim of this study was to compare stereoscopic vision before and after photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) in myopia. Methods: In a prospective interventional case series study clinical trial, forty-eight myopic individuals (age range: 18-34 years) who had undergone PRK surgery by a Bausch & Lomb Technolas 217z excimer laser were included. In all patients, stereoscopic vision was assessed using TNO test charts at 40 cm distance preoperatively and at 3 and 6 months postoperatively. Results: A total of 48 cases (96 eyes, 69% female) with a mean age of 26.70 ± 4.89 years (range: 18-34 years) were treated. Uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA) was improved and refraction was corrected significantly after PRK surgery. The stereoscopic vision in patients was 246.56 ± 98.43 s of arc before PRK surgery. Postoperatively, the stereoacuities were recorded as 365.38 ± 112.65 s of arc and 343.51 ± 88.96 s of arc at 3 and 6 months, respectively. These differences were statistically significant (p < 0.001). Conclusion: PRK was successful and safe in improving refractive error and UCVA, but it may deteriorate the stereoscopic vision. It may be due to an increase in higher order aberrations.

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APA

Zarei-Ghanavati, S., Gharaee, H., Eslampour, A., Ehsaei, A., & Abrishami, M. (2016). Stereoacuity after photorefractive keratectomy in myopia. Journal of Current Ophthalmology, 28(1), 17–20. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.joco.2016.01.005

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