Still heart encodes a structural HMT, SMYD1b, with chaperone-like function during fast muscle sarcomere assembly

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Abstract

© 2015 Prill et al.This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.The vertebrate sarcomere is a complex and highly organized contractile structure whose assembly and function requires the coordination of hundreds of proteins. Proteins require proper folding and incorporation into the sarcomere by assembly factors, and they must also be maintained and replaced due to the constant physical stress of muscle contraction. Zebrafish mutants affecting muscle assembly and maintenance have proven to be an ideal tool for identification and analysis of factors necessary for these processes. The still heart mutant was identified due to motility defects and a nonfunctional heart. The cognate gene for the mutant was shown to be smyd1b and the still heart mutation results in an early nonsense codon. SMYD1 mutants show a lack of heart looping and chamber definition due to a lack of expression of heart morphogenesis factors gata4, gata5 and hand2. On a cellular level, fast muscle fibers in homozygous mutants do not form mature sarcomeres due to the lack of fast muscle myosin incorporation by SMYD1b when sarcomeres are first being assembled (19hpf), supporting SMYD1b as an assembly protein during sarcomere formation.

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Prill, K., Reid, P. W., Wohlgemuth, S. L., & Pilgrim, D. B. (2015). Still heart encodes a structural HMT, SMYD1b, with chaperone-like function during fast muscle sarcomere assembly. PLoS ONE, 10(11). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0142528

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