Study on Prevalence of Gastrointestinal Nematodes and Coccidian Parasites Affecting Cattle in West Arsi zone, Ormia Regional State, Ethiopia

  • Berihu Haftu A
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Abstract

ABSTRACT Livestock production constitutes one of the principal means of achieving improved living standards in many regions of the developing world including Ethiopia. A cross sectional study was conducted from November 2013 to April 2014 to determine the prevalence of gastrointestinal nematodes and coccidia parasites affecting cattle in west Arsi zone using flotation technique to investigate helminthes eggs. A total 384 fecal samples of cattle from different districts of west Arsi zone (Arsi-negele, Shashemene and Kofele) were collected and examined for incidence of gastrointestinal nematodes and coccidial infestation. Out of 384 animals examined, 188 (49%) animals were positive for gastro-intestinal nematodes and coccidian; and out of these positive animals 109 (57.97%) were infested with single genera of gastro- intestinal nematodes and coccidian, which include: ostertagia spp.7(1.8%), oesophagostomum spp. 5(1.3%) , strongloid spp. 10(2.6%), Emeria spp. 11(2.9%), Trychostrongylus spp. 1(3.6%), hemonchus spp. 45 (11.7%), Bunostomum spp. 17(4.4%) and the rest 79 (42.02%) animals were infested with mixed genera of gastro intestinal nematodes. These include oesophagostomum spp. with Trychostrongylus spp. 37 (9.6%), ostertagia spp. with hemonchus spp. 15 (3.9%), Trychostrongylus spp. with hemonchus spp. 17 (4.4%) and strongloid spp. with Bunostomum spp. 10 (2.6%). The prevalence of gastro-intestinal nematodes and coccidia was higher in adult and young animals as compared with calves, higher prevalence were also seen were communal grazing and watering areas are common

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Berihu Haftu, A. B. (2015). Study on Prevalence of Gastrointestinal Nematodes and Coccidian Parasites Affecting Cattle in West Arsi zone, Ormia Regional State, Ethiopia. Journal of Veterinary Science & Technology, 05(05). https://doi.org/10.4172/2157-7579.1000207

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