Subclinical ventricular repolarization abnormality in uncontrolled compared with controlled treated hypertension

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Abstract

Background Antihypertensive medications have variable effects on the duration of the QT interval. This study aims to demonstrate the subclinical ventricular conduction defect in treating hypertensive patients taking in consideration the status of the blood pressure control with the antihypertensive agents. Methods This cross-section study was performed at the Departments of Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Al-Mustansiriya University, Baghdad, Iraq. A total number of 97 hypertensive patients (30 males and 67 females) were eligible to enroll in the study. The patients were grouped into controlled hypertension (Group I) and uncontrolled hypertension (Group II). Each participant is subjected to the electrocardiograph (ECG) investigation. A QT nomogram plot used to identify the patients who are vulnerable or at risk of developing cardiac arrhythmias. Results There were no significant differences in the values of the electrocardiogram determinants between Group I and Group II. Abnormal prolonged QTcB interval observed in 18 out of 80 (22.5%) patients of Group II compared with 4 out of 17. The JT index value of ≥112 was observed in 20 out of 80 (25%) patients of Group II compared with 6 out of 17 (35.3%) patients of Group I. A significant correlation between the QTcB duration with JT index observed in both Groups I and II. Conclusion Patients with hypertension have variability in ventricular repolarization (QTcB and JT) irrespective of their blood pressure control putting them at higher risk of cardiac arrhythmias.

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Al-Nimer, M. S. M., & Hussein, I. I. (2017). Subclinical ventricular repolarization abnormality in uncontrolled compared with controlled treated hypertension. Indian Heart Journal, 69(2), 136–140. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ihj.2016.07.021

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