To Teach, Critique, and Compose: Representing Computers and Composition through the CIWIC/DMAC Institute

0Citations
Citations of this article
23Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

This article examines how the Computers in Writing-Intensive Classrooms (CIWIC)/Digital Media and Composition (DMAC) Institute has realized founding director Cynthia L. Selfe's commitment to prioritizing people first, then teaching, then technology. I analyze how institute curricula introduce and model pedagogies for teaching digital composing, foster networking among participants, articulate a critical stance toward technology, and encourage newcomers to enter the field as administrators and scholars (as well as teachers). I also draw on participant documents (social media posts, publications, and CVs) to investigate the uptake of these ideas. Moving forward, I suggest that in light of the institute's growing emphasis on digital composing, 1) knowledge-making should be seen as the larger frame for CIWIC/DMAC work, and 2) research should be added to the institute's existing articulation of the field in terms of people→teaching→technology.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Voss, J. (2015). To Teach, Critique, and Compose: Representing Computers and Composition through the CIWIC/DMAC Institute. Computers and Composition, 36, 16–31. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compcom.2015.04.003

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free