Testosterone and adipokines are determinants of physical performance, strength, and aerobic fitness in frail, obese, older adults

12Citations
Citations of this article
18Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

In this study, we evaluated the independent and combined effects of baseline circulating gonadal, anabolic hormones and adipokines on physical function in 107 frail, obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m 2 ), and older (≥65 yr) subjects. Our results showed significant positive correlations between circulating testosterone and insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1) with knee flexion, knee extension, one-repetition maximum (1-RM), and peak oxygen consumption (VO 2 peak), while no correlation was observed with estradiol. Among the adipokines, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP) and leptin negatively correlated with the modified physical performance testing (PPT), knee flexion, knee extension, 1-RM, and VO 2 peak. Interleukin-6 ( Il-6) negatively correlated with knee flexion and VO 2 peak and soluble tumor necrosis factors receptor-1 (sTNFr1) correlated with PPT, 1-RM, and VO 2 peak. Adiponectin correlated negatively with 1-RM. Multiple regression analysis revealed that, for PPT, sTNFr1 was the only independent predictor. Independent predictors included adiponectin, leptin, and testosterone for knee flexion; leptin and testosterone for knee extension; adiponectin, leptin, and testosterone for 1-RM; and IGF-1, IL-6, leptin, and testosterone for VO 2 peak. In conclusion, in frail obese older adults, circulating levels of testosterone, adiponectin, and leptin appear to be important predictors of physical strength and fitness, while inflammation appears to be a major determinant of physical frailty.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Aguirre, L. E., Jan, I. Z., Fowler, K., Waters, D. L., Villareal, D. T., & Armamento-Villareal, R. (2014). Testosterone and adipokines are determinants of physical performance, strength, and aerobic fitness in frail, obese, older adults. International Journal of Endocrinology, 2014. https://doi.org/10.1155/2014/507395

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free