Theoretical and experimental performance evaluation of single-slope single-basin solar still with multiple V-shaped floating wicks

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Abstract

A solar still is used to convert saline water into potable water by means of the distillation process. In order to improve the productivity of conventional solar still, various modifications are implemented by researchers. In the present study, multiple V-shaped floating wicks are used to enhance heat absorption and thereby increase productivity. The experiments are performed during the summer and winter seasons in Rewa, India (Latitude: 24.5373° N; Longitude: 81.3042° E). These multiple floating wicks are made from black jute cloth wrapped in V-shaped pieces of thermocol. Because of their V-shaped profile, the evaporative surface area of modified solar still is 26% larger than that of conventional solar still. The maximum daily productivity in one of the clear days is found to be approximately 6.20 kg/m 2 in summer and 3.23 kg/m 2 in winter with daily efficiencies of 56.62% and 47.75%, respectively. A theoretical thermal model is formulated by using the energy balance equations of the modified solar still. Reasonable agreement was seen between the theoretical and experimental results of modified solar still. An economic analysis is also performed for the modified solar still and conventional solar still; in a 10-year life cycle, the annual cost of distilled water is estimated at Rs. 1.81/kg for the former and Rs. 2.24/kg for the latter.

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Agrawal, A., & Rana, R. S. (2019). Theoretical and experimental performance evaluation of single-slope single-basin solar still with multiple V-shaped floating wicks. Heliyon, 5(4). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.heliyon.2019.e01525

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