Trait anxiety, but not trait anger, predisposes obese individuals to emotional eating

30Citations
Citations of this article
77Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.
Get full text

Abstract

The present study examined whether trait anxiety and trait anger are associated with vulnerability to emotional eating, particularly among obese individuals. Lean (n=37) and obese (n=24) participants engaged in a laboratory study where they completed measures of trait anxiety and trait anger at screening and then completed 3 counterbalanced experimental sessions involving different mood inductions (neutral, anxiety, anger). Following each mood induction, participants were provided with snack foods in a sham taste test. Models predicting snack intake revealed a significant trait anxiety×body mass index group interaction, such that high trait anxiety was positively associated with food intake for obese individuals, but not their lean counterparts. Contrary to the hypothesis, trait anger was not associated with food intake for obese or lean participants. Results suggest that trait anxiety may be a risk factor for emotional eating among obese individuals. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Schneider, K. L., Appelhans, B. M., Whited, M. C., Oleski, J., & Pagoto, S. L. (2010). Trait anxiety, but not trait anger, predisposes obese individuals to emotional eating. Appetite, 55(3), 701–706. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2010.10.006

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free