Transcriptional regulation of receptor-like protein genes by environmental stresses and hormones and their overexpression activities in Arabidopsis thaliana

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Abstract

Receptor-like proteins (RLPs) have been implicated in multiple biological processes, including plant development and immunity to microbial infection. Fifty-sevenAtRLPgenes have been identified in Arabidopsis, whereas only a few have been functionally characterized. This is due to the lack of suitable physiological screening conditions and the high degree of functional redundancy amongAtRLPgenes. To overcome the functional redundancy and further understand the role ofAtRLPgenes, we studied the evolution ofAtRLPgenes and compiled a comprehensive profile of the transcriptional regulation ofAtRLPgenes upon exposure to a range of environmental stresses and different hormones. These results indicate that the majority ofAtRLPgenes are differentially expressed under various conditions that were tested, an observation that will help to select certainAtRLPgenes involved in a specific biological process for further experimental studies to eventually dissect their function. A large number ofAtRLPgenes were found to respond to more than one treatment, suggesting that one singleAtRLPgene may be involved in multiple physiological processes. In addition, we performed a genome-wide cloning of theAtRLPgenes, and generated and characterized transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing the individualAtRLPgenes, presenting new insight into the roles ofAtRLPgenes, as exemplified byAtRLP3,AtRLP11andAtRLP28 Our study provides an overview of biological processes in whichAtRLPgenes may be involved, and presents valuable resources for future investigations into the function of these genes.

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Wu, J., Liu, Z., Zhang, Z., Lv, Y., Yang, N., Zhang, G., … Wang, G. (2016). Transcriptional regulation of receptor-like protein genes by environmental stresses and hormones and their overexpression activities in Arabidopsis thaliana. Journal of Experimental Botany, 67(11), 3339–3351. https://doi.org/10.1093/jxb/erw152

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