Treatment of multiple traumatized anterior teeth associated with an alveolar bone fracture in a 20-year-old patient: A 3-year follow up

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Abstract

Intrusive luxation is a type of recognizable luxation injury represented by a deeper axial displacement of the tooth toward the alveolar bone. Treatment strategies include waiting for the tooth to return to its position, immediate surgical repositioning, and repositioning through dental traction by orthodontic devices. The aim of this case report was to present the management of severe dental trauma and later restoration following IADT. A 20-year-old patient was presented after fainting at home four hours before, resulting in a dento-alveolar trauma. Clinical examinations revealed a traumatic intrusion, in 1.2, 1.1 and 2.1, uncomplicated crown fractures in 1.1 and 2.1 and a complicated crown-root fracture in 2.2. The diagnosis was confirmed with CBCT. Following IADT protocol, the emergency treatment consisted of the surgical repositioning and semi-rigid splinting using orthodontic wire-composite, replacing the buccal bone plate, and postoperative instructions to the patient regarding oral hygiene. After 2 weeks the root canal treated and filled with fiberglass posts in 1.2, 1.1, 2.1 and 2.2. Splint was removed after 4 weeks and the IADT reassessment protocol followed, with revisions at 6-8 weeks, 6 months, a year and annual reviews for 5 years. A year after the treatment, the traumatized teeth were restored with minimally invasive preparations of feldspathic ceramic. Esthetics and function were recorded with a 3-year follow-up period. Key words:Intrusive luxation, dental trauma, crown-root fracture, dento-alveolar trauma, permanent tooth, CBCT.

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Faus-Matoses, V., Martínez-Viñarta, M., Alegre-Domingo, T., Faus-Matoses, I., & Faus-Llácer, V. J. (2014). Treatment of multiple traumatized anterior teeth associated with an alveolar bone fracture in a 20-year-old patient: A 3-year follow up. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Dentistry, 6(4), e425–e429. https://doi.org/10.4317/jced.51374

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