A usability study of an internet-delivered behavioural intervention tailored for children with residual insomnia symptoms after obstructive sleep apnea treatment

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Abstract

Better Nights, Better Days (BNBD) is a 5-session online intervention designed to treat insomnia in 1–10-year-old children (Corkum et al. 2016). Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and insomnia commonly occur in children and, after surgical treatment for OSA, it is estimated that up to 50% of children may continue to suffer from insomnia symptoms. Access to insomnia interventions following OSA treatment is limited as there are few programs available, few trained practitioners to deliver these programs, and limited recognition that these problems exist. The current study involved the usability testing of an internet-based parent-directed session of BNBD tailored towards the needs of children (ages 4–10 years) who experience residual insomnia symptoms after treatment of OSA. This new session was added to the BNBD program. Participants (n = 43) included 6 parents, 17 sleep experts, and 20 front-line healthcare providers who completed and provided feedback on the new session. Participants completed a feedback questionnaire, with both quantitative and qualitative questions, after reviewing the session. Quantitative responses analyzed via descriptive statistics suggested that the session was primarily viewed as helpful by most participants, and open-ended qualitative questions analyzed by content analyses generated a mix of positive and constructive feedback. The results provide insights on how to optimally tailor the BNBD program to meet the needs of the target population and suggest that testing the session on a larger scale would be beneficial.

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APA

Orr, M., Isaacs, J., Godbout, R., Witmans, M., & Corkum, P. (2019). A usability study of an internet-delivered behavioural intervention tailored for children with residual insomnia symptoms after obstructive sleep apnea treatment. Internet Interventions, 18. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.invent.2019.100265

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