Variation in the perilipin gene (PLIN) affects glucose and lipid metabolism in non-Hispanic white women with and without polycystic ovary syndrome

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Abstract

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrine disorders in women. It is characterized by chronic anovulation, hyperandrogenism, obesity and a predisposition to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Since obesity plays an important role in the etiology of PCOS, we sought to determine if variants in the perilipin gene (PLIN), a gene previously implicated in the development of obesity, were also associated with PCOS. We typed six single nucleotide polymorphisms (haplotype tagging and/or previously associated with obesity or related metabolic traits) in PLIN in 305 unrelated non-Hispanic white women (185 with PCOS and 120 without PCOS). None of the variants was associated with PCOS (P < 0.05). However, the variant rs1052700*A was associated with increased risk for glucose intolerance (impaired glucose tolerance or T2DM) in both non-PCOS (OR = 1.75 [1.02-3.01], P = 0.044) and PCOS subjects (OR = 1.67 [1.08-2.59], P = 0.022). It was also associated with increased LDL (P = 0.007) and total cholesterol levels (P = 0.042). These results suggest that genetic variation in PLIN may affect glucose and lipid metabolism in women both with and without PCOS. © 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

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Kawai, T., Ng, M. C. Y., Hayes, M. G., Yoshiuchi, I., Tsuchiya, T., Robertson, H., … Ehrmann, D. A. (2009). Variation in the perilipin gene (PLIN) affects glucose and lipid metabolism in non-Hispanic white women with and without polycystic ovary syndrome. Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, 86(3), 186–192. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.diabres.2009.09.002

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