Vitamin D receptor gene foki polymorphism contributes to increasing the risk of HIV-negative tuberculosis: Evidence from a meta-Analysis

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene FokI polymorphism have been studied in relation to tuberculosis (TB) in many populations and provided inconsistent results. In this study, we carried out a meta-analysis to derive a more reliable assessment on FokI polymorphism and the risk of HIV-negative TB.<br /><br />METHODS: The Embase, PubMed, and Cochrane Library databases were used to undertake a comprehensive systematic literature review of all current published VDR gene FOKI association studies aimed at the risk of TB up to June 30, 2015. Odds ratios (ORs) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to measure the strength of the models.<br /><br />RESULTS: A total of 14 studies (1,668 cases and 1,893 controls) were retrieved in the meta-analysis. The pooled OR was 1.60 (95% = 1.28-1.97, P<0.001; I2 = 29.5%, and P = 0.141 for heterogeneity) in the best genetic model (recessive model: ff vs. fF+FF). In the subgroup analysis by ethnicities, a significantly increased risk was found in the Asian group (OR = 1.82, 95% CI = 1.42-2.33, P<0.001; I2 = 31.0%, and P = 0.150 for heterogeneity) in the recessive model. Similarly, significant associations were also found in the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism group, high-quality studies, and the population based or hospital based groups. Moderate heterogeneity was found in this study.<br /><br />CONCLUSION: Our results suggested that VDR FokI polymorphism contributes to increasing the risk of TB in HIV-negative individuals, especially in the Asian region. Further studies on this topic in other races are expected to be conducted in future.

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Xu, C., Tang, P., Ding, C., Li, C., Chen, J., Xu, Z., … Zhao, J. (2015). Vitamin D receptor gene foki polymorphism contributes to increasing the risk of HIV-negative tuberculosis: Evidence from a meta-Analysis. PLoS ONE, 10(10). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0140634

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