In vivo turnover of tau and APP metabolites in the brains of wild-type and Tg2576 mice: Greater stability of sAPP in the β-amyloid depositing mice

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Abstract

The metabolism of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and tau are central to the pathobiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have examined the in vivo turnover of APP, secreted APP (sAPP), Aβ and tau in the wild-type and Tg2576 mouse brain using cycloheximide to block protein synthesis. In spite of overexpression of APP in the Tg2576 mouse, APP is rapidly degraded, similar to the rapid turnover of the endogenous protein in the wild-type mouse. sAPP is cleared from the brain more slowly, particularly in the Tg2576 model where the half-life of both the endogenous murine and transgene-derived human sAPP is nearly doubled compared to wild-type mice. The important Aβ degrading enzymes neprilysin and IDE were found to be highly stable in the brain, and soluble Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels in both wild-type and Tg2576 mice rapidly declined following the depletion of APP. The cytoskeletal-associated protein tau was found to be highly stable in both wild-type and Tg2576 mice. Our findings unexpectedly show that of these various AD-relevant protein metabolites, sAPP turnover in the brain is the most different when comparing a wild-type mouse and a β-amyloid depositing, APP overexpressing transgenic model. Given the neurotrophic roles attributed to sAPP, the enhanced stability of sAPP in the β-amyloid depositing Tg2576 mice may represent a neuroprotective response. © 2009 Morales-Corraliza et al.

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Morales-Corraliza, J., Mazzella, M. J., Berger, J. D., Diaz, N. S., Choi, J. H. K., Levy, E., … Mathews, P. M. (2009). In vivo turnover of tau and APP metabolites in the brains of wild-type and Tg2576 mice: Greater stability of sAPP in the β-amyloid depositing mice. PLoS ONE, 4(9). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0007134

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