Water contact angles on quartz surfaces under supercritical CO 2 sequestration conditions: Experimental and molecular dynamics simulation studies

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Abstract

The ambiguity of contact angle experimental measurements due to surface chemistry changes resulted from sample contamination and/or the degrees of reaction with supercritical CO 2 has resulted in great difficulties to precisely understand the wetting behavior of CO 2 under the geological carbon sequestration (GCS) conditions. In this study, water contact angles on quartz surface under GCS conditions were investigated through the combined experimental and molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) methods. The experimental results show that water contact angles increases as ionic strength increases. The effects of pressure and temperature are very weak. The dependence of ionic strength, pressure and temperature is same for monovalent and divalent ions solutions. In the MDS, a hydroxylated quartz surface was used as the base point. A good agreement between the MDS and experimental results were obtained. Using the MDS method, a clean mineral surface with a desired surface chemistry can be constructed, which is difficult in experiments. So by comparing MDS and experimental results, the mechanisms of the reservoir wettability can be better understood. Further investigation can be made on quartz surface with different functional groups to better understand wettability alteration caused by contamination and/or CO 2 reaction.

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Chen, C., Wan, J., Li, W., & Song, Y. (2015). Water contact angles on quartz surfaces under supercritical CO 2 sequestration conditions: Experimental and molecular dynamics simulation studies. International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, 42, 655–665. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijggc.2015.09.019

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