Why women see differently from the way men see? A review of sex differences in cognition and sports

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Abstract

The differences of learning and memory between males and females have been well documented and confirmed by both human and animal studies. The sex differences in cognition started from early stage of neuronal development and last through entire lifespan. The major biological basis of the gender-dependent cognitive activity includes two major components: sex hormone and sex-related characteristics, such as sex-determining region of the Y chromosome (SRY) protein. However, the knowledge of how much biology of sex contributes to normal cognitive function and elite athletes in various sports are still pretty limited. In this review, we will be focusing on sex differences in spatial learning and memory - especially the role of male- and female-type cognitive behaviors in sports. © 2014 Shanghai University of Sport.

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APA

Li, R. (2014). Why women see differently from the way men see? A review of sex differences in cognition and sports. Journal of Sport and Health Science. Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jshs.2014.03.012

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