Biomedical Engineering

In this subdiscipline: 103 papers

Discipline summary

Biomedical engineering (BME) is the application of engineering principles and design concepts to medicine and biology for healthcare purposes (e.g. diagnostic or therapeutic). This field seeks to close the gap between engineering and medicine: It combines the design and problem solving skills of engineering with medical and biological sciences to advance healthcare treatment, including diagnosis, monitoring, and therapy.

Popular papers

  1. This article concludes a series of papers concerned with the flow of electric current through the surface membrane of a giant nerve fibre (Hodgkinet al., 1952,J. Physiol.116, 424-448; Hodgkin and Huxley 1952,J. Physiol.116, 449-566). Its general…
  2. Early number sense is a strong predictor of later success in school mathematics. A disproportionate number of children from low-income families come to first grade with weak number competencies, leaving them at risk for a cycle of failure. The…
  3. Normal urothelial cultures were established from transplant ureters and irradiated or exposed to nitrosamines. The cells which survived the treatment were monitored for expression of c-myc oncoprotein. The cultures were also exposed to tritiated…
  4. Ten years after the publication of the position paper The hallmarks of cancer (Hanahan and Weinberg Cell 100:5770, 2000), it has become increasingly clear that mutated cells on their way to giving rise to a tumor have also to learn how to thrive in…
  5. Predicting the binding mode of flexible polypeptides to proteins is an important task that falls outside the domain of applicability of most small molecule and protein−protein docking tools. Here, we test the small molecule flexible ligand docking…
  6. Development of an in vitro prevascularized scaffold is of great importance to produce vascularization in tissue-engineered devices and for other clinical purposes. To this aim, polymer fibres covered with human umbilical vein endothelial cells…
  7. All fields of neuroscience that employ brain imaging need to communicate their results with reference to anatomical regions. In particular, comparative morphometry and group analysis of functional and physiological data require coregistration of…

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