Medical Imaging

In this subdiscipline: 57 papers

Discipline summary

Medical imaging is the technique and process used to create images of the human body (or parts and function thereof) for clinical purposes (medical procedures seeking to reveal, diagnose or examine disease) or medical science (including the study of normal anatomy and physiology), including, but not limited to: X-Ray, CT, MRI, PET, and Ultrasound

Popular papers

  1. The use of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is growing exponentially, in part because of the excellent anatomic and pathologic detail provided by the modality and because of recent technologic advances that have led to faster acquisition times.…
  2. Background: Assessment of the change in tumour burden is an important feature of the clinical evaluation of cancer therapeutics: both tumour shrinkage (objective response) and disease progression are useful endpoints in clinical trials. Since RECIST…
  3. T1, T2, and magnetization transfer (MT) measurements were performed in vitro at 3 T and 37 degrees C on a variety of tissues: mouse liver, muscle, and heart; rat spinal cord and kidney; bovine optic nerve, cartilage, and white and gray matter; and…
  4. This article describes basic radiation dose concepts as well as those specifically developed to describe the radiation dose from computed tomography (CT). Basic concepts of radiation dose are reviewed, including exposure, absorbed dose, and…
  5. Lung nodules are detected very commonly on computed tomographic (CT) scans of the chest, and the ability to detect very small nodules improves with each new generation of CT scanner. In reported studies, up to 51% of smokers aged 50 years or older…
  6. Contrast material enhancement for cross-sectional imaging has been used since the mid 1970s for computed tomography and the mid 1980s for magnetic resonance imaging. Knowledge of the patterns and mechanisms of contrast enhancement facilitate…
  7. Studies of transgenic mice provide powerful means to investigate the in vivo biological significance of gene products. Mice with an under- or overexpression of enzymes involved in high-energy phosphoryl transfer (approximately P) are particulary…
  8. SUMMARY: Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) has continued to develop into a powerful clinical tool to visualize venous structures and iron in the brain and to study diverse pathologic conditions. SWI offers a unique contrast, different from spin…
  9. Artifacts in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging result from the complex interaction of contemporary imager subsystems, including the main magnet, gradient coils, radiofrequency (RF) transmitter and receiver, and reconstruction algorithm used. An…
  10. We describe a standard set of quantity names and symbols related to the estimation of kinetic parameters from dynamic contrast-enhanced T(1)-weighted magnetic resonance imaging data, using diffusable agents such as gadopentetate dimeglumine…
  11. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are unique neoplasms that occur throughout the gastrointestinal tract, mesentery, omentum, and retroperitoneum. They are the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract and are defined by…

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