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Charlette Terrones
“Someone Has Reported Your Actions” Facebook Phishing Scam by Oakmere Road

Outline:
Message purporting to be from Facebook Security Management claims that your account will be disabled because other users have reported your actions. It instructs you to click a link to re-confirm your details or Facebook will remove your account.

Brief Analysis:
The message is not an official Facebook security warning. Instead, it is a phishing scam designed to steal your Facebook login details as well as your credit card numbers, your email account password, and other identifying information. It is just one in a long line of very similar scam messages. If you receive one of these messages, do not click on any links that it contains.

Example:
WARNING: Your account will be disabled!
Our system has received the reports from the other users about the misuse of your account. Someone has reported your actions, which violations of our terms.
Facebook does not allow:
• Pretending to be someone else
• Interfere with another comfort for the user
• Having more than one Facebook
• Share link or video content with pornographic videos
If you are really user of this account, you’ll need to re-confirm your account. It’s easy, Click the link below to confirm your account:

If you do not immediately confirm a grace period of 12 hours after you receive this message, so sorry we will remove of your account.

Thanks,
Miller
Security Management
Facebook

Detailed Analysis:
According to this warning message, which claims to be from “Miller” at “Security Management Facebook”, your Facebook account is set to be disabled. Supposedly, you have been misusing your account and someone has therefore reported your actions.

The message then claims that you must click a link to re-confirm your account within 12 hours or Facebook will remove the offending account. The warning is distributed via Facebook’s internal messaging system.

However, the message is certainly not from any official security manager at Facebook. And the claim that your account will be disabled if you do not confirm your information is a lie.

If you are taken in by the ruse and click the link in the hope of saving your account, you will be taken to a fraudulent webpage that has been built to emulate the real Facebook website. The fake webpage asks you to “login” with your Facebook email address and password. Next, a second form will appear that asks you to provide your webmail address and password as well as your date of birth, country, phone number, and account security question:

Finally, you will be redirected to the Facebook Newsroom website. At this point, you may believe that you have successfully confirmed your information and thereby avoided the threatened account removal.

In reality, however, online criminals now have a good deal of your personal and financial information. They can use your information to hijack both your Facebook account and email account. Once they have gained entry to these accounts, they can use them to send out further scam and spam messages. They may send new versions of the above scam to your friends from your Facebook account via private messages.

The criminals can also use your credit card to conduct fraudulent transactions. They may also manage to use all of the personal information they have collected to steal your identity.

This criminal tactic is not new. In fact, this scam message is just one in a long line of very similar scams that have targeted Facebook users for several years. Be wary of any message that purports to be from Facebook and claims that your account will be disabled or suspended if you do not click a link to verify your account details.

Backlnks:
https://www.mendeley.com/groups/9277621/oakmere-road/
https://www.quora.com/What-is-Oakmere-Road
Charlette Terrones likes this.
anthony evans
Oakmere Road: Phishing attacks on the rise

There has been a notable escalation in phishing attacks in 2016, according to a new report from the Anti-Phishing Working Group (APWG). It noted that there have been more phishing attacks during the the first quarter of this year, “than at any other time in history”.

There was a huge spike in phishing activity between October 2015 and March 2016, with incidents rising by a massive 250%, the study highlighted.

“We always see a surge in phishing during the holiday season, but the number of phishing sites kept going up from December into the spring of 2016,” commented Greg Aaron, a senior research fellow at APWG and vice-president of the iThreat Cyber Group.

“The sustained increase into 2016 shows phishers launching more sites, and is cause for concern.”

Phishing is a tactic used by cybercriminals and fraudsters to secure sensitive information from people. Deceptive emails, texts and instant messaging alerts – to name but a few – are sent to potential victims encouraging them to hand over their data.

The fraudulent messaging often looks and sounds authentic. Interestingly, as the authors of the paper state, phishing attacks are increasingly more aggressive. For example, keyloggers have been a notable feature in attacks in 2016, used to “target specific information and organizations”.

The authors of the report also touched upon the growing threat posed by ransomware. As with phishing, the attacks have demonstrated a more aggressive streak.

“The threat space continues to expand despite the best efforts of industry, government and law enforcement,” observed Peter Cassidy, co-founder and secretary general of the APWG.

Backlnks:
https://www.mendeley.com/groups/9277621/oakmere-road/
https://www.quora.com/What-is-Oakmere-Road
anthony evans likes this.
Florian Dresner
Oakmere Road: “Someone Has Reported Your Actions” Facebook Phishing Scam

Outline:
Message purporting to be from Facebook Security Management claims that your account will be disabled because other users have reported your actions. It instructs you to click a link to re-confirm your details or Facebook will remove your account.

Brief Analysis:
The message is not an official Facebook security warning. Instead, it is a phishing scam designed to steal your Facebook login details as well as your credit card numbers, your email account password, and other identifying information. It is just one in a long line of very similar scam messages. If you receive one of these messages, do not click on any links that it contains.

Example:
WARNING: Your account will be disabled!
Our system has received the reports from the other users about the misuse of your account. Someone has reported your actions, which violations of our terms.
Facebook does not allow:
• Pretending to be someone else
• Interfere with another comfort for the user
• Having more than one Facebook
• Share link or video content with pornographic videos
If you are really user of this account, you’ll need to re-confirm your account. It’s easy, Click the link below to confirm your account:

If you do not immediately confirm a grace period of 12 hours after you receive this message, so sorry we will remove of your account.
Thanks,
Miller
Security Management
Facebook

Detailed Analysis:
According to this warning message, which claims to be from “Miller” at “Security Management Facebook”, your Facebook account is set to be disabled. Supposedly, you have been misusing your account and someone has therefore reported your actions.

The message then claims that you must click a link to re-confirm your account within 12 hours or Facebook will remove the offending account. The warning is distributed via Facebook’s internal messaging system.

However, the message is certainly not from any official security manager at Facebook. And the claim that your account will be disabled if you do not confirm your information is a lie.

If you are taken in by the ruse and click the link in the hope of saving your account, you will be taken to a fraudulent webpage that has been built to emulate the real Facebook website. The fake webpage asks you to “login” with your Facebook email address and password. Next, a second form will appear that asks you to provide your webmail address and password as well as your date of birth, country, phone number, and account security question:

Finally, you will be redirected to the Facebook Newsroom website. At this point, you may believe that you have successfully confirmed your information and thereby avoided the threatened account removal.

In reality, however, online criminals now have a good deal of your personal and financial information. They can use your information to hijack both your Facebook account and email account. Once they have gained entry to these accounts, they can use them to send out further scam and spam messages. They may send new versions of the above scam to your friends from your Facebook account via private messages.

The criminals can also use your credit card to conduct fraudulent transactions. They may also manage to use all of the personal information they have collected to steal your identity.

Backlnks:
https://www.mendeley.com/groups/9277621/oakmere-road/
https://www.quora.com/What-is-Oakmere-Road
Florian Dresner likes this.
Jaxon Laurantus
Oakmere Road: New phishing scam targets fans of popular television show

The hugely popular hit HBO show "Game of Thrones" was the most pirated program in 2015. It's been a constant problem for HBO and the company often has to send out warning emails to users and take down demands to torrent sites.

But now, even if you're not pirating "Game of Thrones" you could get one of these notices - but it's not what it seems. Scammers have started to send spoof warning emails from HBO in order to get victims to to send over some serious cash.

The spoof emails instruct the victim to pay a few hundred dollars as part of a settlement for being caught pirating Season 6, Episode 10 of "Game of Thrones." The email reads:

"On this regard, request is hereby made that you and all persons using this account immediately and permanently cease and desist the unauthorized copying and/or distribution of the Work listed in this notice. You may also be liable for monetary damages, including court costs and/or attorney fees if a lawsuit is commenced against you."

The email later says you only have 72 hours to complete your settlement, otherwise further legal action will be taken.

The email is very convincing and could fool nearly everyone. It is professionally-worded and has minimal typos. So in this case, the best defense might be knowing what HBO's real cease and desist letters look like:

It's important to note that the real cease and desist letter doesn't demand money and there's no time limit. It also specifically names the IP address, whereas the fake email doesn't.

WHAT YOU CAN DO TO STAY SAFE
Scammers are getting trickier by the day, so you'll have to stay one step ahead of them. One way to do this is to know the warning signs and red flags to look for before clicking on any links or sending out any sensitive information.

- Keep an eye out for typos and bad grammar.
- Be able to identify where the email is coming from.
- Hover your mouse over any links before you click to see where they are pointing.
- Click here to take the Phishing Email quiz to see if you can spot all the warning signs of a phishing scam.
- Be wary of email-only wire transfer requests and requests involving urgency.
- Be cautious of mimicked email addresses.
- Practice multi-level authentication.
- Protect yourself with online security software. We recommend our sponsor, Kaspersky Lab, which offers software that helps to filter out and warn you about phishing scams, so your odds of being tricked are slim. Kaspersky Total Security can recognize and block malicious links and Trojan programs, and covers up to five devices on one license. Buy it today and save 50%.

Backlnks:
https://www.mendeley.com/groups/9277621/oakmere-road/
https://www.quora.com/What-is-Oakmere-Road
Jaxon Laurantus likes this.
Annabelle Mouratidis
Oakmere Road: Business Email Compromise – Top Phishing Attacks of 2016

In this series of blog posts we examine the most common forms of phishing attacks and appropriate countermeasures to protect both individuals and organizations – in this post we explore Business Email Compromise and the potential fall-out for executives.

Business Email Compromise

At the start of 2016, the FBI warned that it had seen a 270% increase in CEO scams, also known as Business Email Compromise (BEC) scams.

With these scams, savvy cyber criminals are taking the time to harvest personal information and learn the processes within a company. Once armed with this information, they target carefully selected employees with a spear phishing email designed to get access to confidential business information or transfer money into an unknown account.

Companies that have recently fallen victim to this kind of criminal fraud include:

- Ubiquiti Networks – the finance department was targeted by a fraudulent request from an outside entity that resulted in $46.7 million being transferred to an overseas account held by external third parties after an employee was impersonated.
- Mattel – a finance executive wired more than $3 million to the Bank of Wenzhou after the ‘new CEO’ requested a vendor payment. According to reports, Mattel quickly realized that it had been victim of a fraudulent request and worked with Chinese authorities to get the money back.
- FACC – the Austrian aircraft parts maker, whose customers included Airbus, Boeing and Rolls-Royce, reported that they had fired their chief executive after cyber criminals stole €50 million ($55.7 million) in an email scam.

Agari research found that more than 85% of spear phishing attacks are enabled by legitimate cloud services, and the majority do not contain a malicious link or attachment, which make them a lot harder to detect.

BEC Countermeasures

A multi-pronged approach is required to counter these types of targeted attacks:
1. Strengthen Internal Processes – To counter the threat of this type of attack, organizations must introduce policies that ensure that no one person or single email can authorize transactions. Instead, there needs to be a mixture of communication channels verifying any request for confidential or financial information.
2. Multi-Layered Approach – There is not a single solution available that can solve the breadth of the email security problem. What’s needed is multiple controls – a cocktail of complementary solutions that provides a multi-layered approach to cyber security where prevention, early detection, attack containment, and recovery measures are considered collectively.
3. Establish Per-message Authenticity – Organizations need a solution that considers sophisticated data science and email security intelligence in order to reinstill trust into the email ecosystem and establish the ‘true’ identity of an email’s sender.

Download Agari’s executive brief on the Top Phishing Attacks of 2016 to learn more about best practices to stopping phishing attacks.

You can also check out the other posts in the Top Phishing Scams series:

- Ransomware
- Data Breach of Employee Information
- Consumer Email Fraud
- Hacktivism

Backlnks:
https://www.mendeley.com/groups/9277621/oakmere-road/
https://www.quora.com/What-is-Oakmere-Road
Annabelle Mouratidis likes this.
Joseph Shackleton
Top Story: Apple customers targeted with massive email scam by Oakmere Road

There's been an alarming number of phishing scams identified this year and these emails are getting more clever and realistic than ever.

The latest phishing email you need to keep an eye out for disguises itself as an iTunes email. Much like the Amazon phishing scam we showed you, this email claims that you have been overcharged for a download purchase, $25 for one song, which is usually $1.99 or less, or $45 for the Netflix app.

The email will show you a very official-looking billing statement and will encourage you to click a link that says, "Cancel andx Manage Subscriptions." But, because you're a Komando.com reader, you'll notice the typo in the link and know that's red flag number one.

Whatever you do, don't click that link. It could take you to a malicious site that can steal all of your valuable information, then it's game over.

If you think you really might have been overcharged, check your bank statements first before clicking any links.

Just being in the know about these emails is step one. There are other steps you can take to keep yourself safe from these phishing attempts. If you see an email like this in your inbox:

- Be sure to exercise caution before you click on anything. Hover over any links and see where they direct before you click. If the links provided go to a website, don't click it. Navigate to the company's site yourself without the link.
- Take some time and try to spot the typos.
- If you're not sure that you can spot the signs, click here to take our phishing IQ test to see how many stand out to you.
- Practice multi-level authentication, which means you have at least two forms of verification, such as a password and a security question before you log into any sensitive accounts.
- Another thing is to have an internet security system. We recommend our sponsor Kaspersky Lab. Software from Kaspersky Lab can recognize and block ransomware. Even if it's a new version or unknown version of a ransomware, Kaspersky Lab can figure out that the program is doing something it shouldn't. Kaspersky Lab will stop it from running and will roll back any files that were encrypted to a previous non-encrypted version. Of course, Kaspersky Lab software also helps filter out and warn you about phishing scams, so your odds of downloading a ransomware virus are slim. Get this protection, and so much more, with Kaspersky Total Security.

Backlnks:
https://www.mendeley.com/groups/9277621/oakmere-road/
https://www.quora.com/What-is-Oakmere-Road
Joseph Shackleton likes this.
anthony evans
Oakmere Road: Phishing and Other Suspicious Emails

Phishing refers to an email that attempts to fraudulently acquire personal information from you, such as your Apple ID, password and/or credit card information. On the surface, the email may appear to be from a legitimate company or individual, but it's not.

As a general rule, never send credit card information, account passwords, or extensive personal information in an email unless you verify that the recipient is who they claim to be. Many companies have policies that state they will never solicit such information from customers by email.

If you are concerned that your Apple ID or other Apple accounts may have been compromised, please refer to Apple ID Security below.

Reporting Suspected Phishing Attempts
If you receive what you believe to be a phishing email purporting to be from Apple, please send it to reportphishing@apple.com, a monitored email inbox, which does not generate individual email replies.

Forwarding the message with complete header information provides Apple with important information. To do this in OS X Mail, select the message and choose Forward As Attachment from the Message menu. For other email applications or webmail based services, consult your provider’s support information to determine how to forward messages with complete headers.

Additional Information Regarding Phishing
For more information about identifying legitimate emails from the iTunes Store, see Identifying legitimate emails from the iTunes Store.

For more information about identifying “phishing” emails, see Identifying fraudulent ‘phishing’ emails.

Reporting Other Suspicious Email
To report spam or other suspicious emails that you have received in your iCloud.com, me.com or mac.com inbox, please send them to abuse@icloud.com.

To report spam or other suspicious messages that you have received through iMessage, please send them to imessage.spam@apple.com with the requested information.

Apple ID and Account Security
For information about best practices in Apple ID security, see Apple ID: Security and your Apple ID.

For information about two-step verification for Apple ID, see Apple ID: Frequently asked questions about two-step verification for Apple ID.

If you believe that your Apple ID has been compromised, please visit Apple ID to change your password immediately.

If you need additional help, contact Apple Support for assistance:

- Apple ID Support
- iCloud Support
- iTunes Store Support
- iPhoto Support
- Apple Store Support

Backlnks:
https://www.mendeley.com/groups/9277621/oakmere-road/
https://www.quora.com/What-is-Oakmere-Road
anthony evans likes this.
Jaxon Laurantus
Oakmere Road: Top 5 social media scams to avoid

Scammers have been worming their way into giant social media networks to trick people into giving over their personal and financial information.

Over the past year, the number of phishing attempts on social media networks like Facebook (FB, Tech30), Twitter (TWTR, Tech30), Instagram and LinkedIn (LNKD, Tech30) has exploded 150%, experts at security firm Proofpoint (PFPT) say.

That's because fraudsters can use social media to target hundreds of thousands of people at once, but also blend in with the crowd. They mimic users and their activities, and they take advantage of the way people use social media to deal with business problems.

Here are five of the most cleverly cloaked scams on social media right now, according to Proofpoint:

1. Fake customer service accounts on Twitter
Online criminals set up fake customer service accounts to phish for bank login and password information and other sensitive data. These imposter accounts look very similar to that of real businesses, but are often one character off -- or they include an extra underscore or other keyboard character.
When someone tweets at their bank or example, scam artists will intercept the conversation, and reply to that message with what seems like an authentic answer.

2. Fake comments on popular posts
A popular news story or social media post might generate a lot of comments. Fraudsters like to take advantage of that large audience by adding their own comments with links to other buzzy headlines that lead to credit card phishing scams.

3. Fake live-stream videos
As more media companies start streaming their shows and movies online, scammers are jumping on the bandwagon.
They do things like comment on the Facebook page of a sports team with a link that leads people to believe they can watch a free live stream of a game. But the links lead to a fake website that asks for personal information in order to start the video, which very often doesn't exist.

4. Fake online discounts
Fake online discounts work similarly to fake customer service accounts. Schemers will set up social media accounts that look like legit businesses, then pretend to offer a real promotion. In reality, they want to trick people into giving up their personal information.

5. Fake online surveys and contests
These tactics have been around for years and are designed to get answers to personal questions that fraudsters can mine and sell later. But criminals embed them into social media posts that often look legit because there's a normal looking profile picture and link, thanks to URL shorteners.

Backlnks:
http://pdfsr.com/pdf/top-scams-for-college-students-to-avoid-by-oakmere-road.pdf
https://efuneral.tackk.com/board/Oakmere-Road
Jaxon Laurantus likes this.
John Rodarte
Top scams for college students to avoid by Oakmere Road

EAU CLAIRE, Wis. (RELEASE) -- College students are often intended targets of scams. Newly independent and excited to be on their own, that freedom can make them targets of and susceptible to scams.

Students don’t always necessarily recognize when a scam comes knocking. As college students begin to head back to campus, the BBB wants to remind students and parents about preventing fraud when they’re away from home.

BBB has some information on the top scams for college students to avoid:

Roommate/Rental scheme – If you post an ad for a roommate on Craigslist, beware of “fake roommates” who are out of the country, but can provide the rent upfront in the form of a money order. When you receive it, the amount is higher than the amount requested (overpayment scam). You are asked to cash it, and wire back the rest. This is a scam!

Credit Cards – Credit card offers are all over campus. While it’s important to build credit, it’s more important to maintain good credit. Many of these cards have annual fees or charge high interest rates on purchases. Shop around for the best rate and pay off your credit card bills every month.

Employment – Beware of ads that pop up near campus offering jobs with “no experience necessary.” Often, these “opportunities” are bogus! If you are interviewed in a hotel lobby or required to sign a contract, or have to pay for everything including training, travel, lodging, food, etc. associated with the job – forget it! Check out a company first with bbb.org.

Scholarship/Grants – Scholarship-finding services “guarantee” grants or scholarships. They sell lists to students on potential scholarship or grant opportunities. However, nearly all available financial aid comes from the federal government or from individual colleges. Go to grants.gov for more information.

Safeguard your ID – Keep your personal information, including your driver’s license, student ID, debit cards, credit cards, and bank information in a SAFE place. Be wary of any online solicitations, emails, social media sites, or phone calls asking for your personal information. NEVER give out personal information to someone you don’t know.

Backlnks:
http://sgblogs.com/pages/80021348-scholarship-scams-target-college-students-by-oakmere-road
http://wondergirls.inube.com/tag/oakmere-road-scholarship-scams-target-college-students/
http://www.slideshare.net/jaxonlaurantus/oakmere-road-how-first-year-college-students-can-avoid-being-victims-of-scammers
John Rodarte likes this.
Joseph Shackleton
Oakmere Road: Scholarship scams target college students

As college students and parents seek assistance to cover the ever-soaring costs of tuition, some have been targeted by scammers offering false promises of scholarships and grants.

“At CPA, we always encourage prospective and current families to apply for as many scholarships as possible in order to receive the maximum amount of free financial help,” said Mary King of College Parents of America. “Free is a key word. Remember to apply more, but give the least amount of information needed, and never pay to win money.”

According to the Federal Trade Commission, unscrupulous companies sometimes approach prospective college students with bogus offers of scholarships, financial aid or consulting services in exchange for an application fee or payment. Some use high-pressure sales pitches at seminars, urging students to pay immediately or risk in losing out on opportunities for aid.

“We don’t know how widespread this is,” FTC spokesman Frank Dorman said.

Some scammers, according to the FTC, guarantee the students will get their fees refunded if they don’t receive a scholarship, but then attach conditions that make it impossible to collect a refund.

Others tell students they’ve been selected as finalists for awards and demand an upfront fee, or request bank account information on the false premise of confirming their eligibility.

“Don’t pay,” King advised. “Legitimate scholarships do not require a fee. Stay away from any types of fees when looking for scholarships.”

Legitimate scholarships, she said, also don’t require recipients to provide personal banking or credit card information.

Conducting some online research into the background of a scholarship or consulting company can also help students spot fraudulent or deceptive offers, she said.

Signs that a scholarship offer may be a scam include the presence of application fees, no proof of past winners, no phone number listed, a request for personal financial information and winning a scholarship you didn’t apply for, King said.

There are also companies that claim they have programs that can increase a student’s eligibility for certain scholarships or grants.

Some legitimate companies provide students with lists of scholarships or run students’ profiles through national scholarship databases to find potential scholarships for which they’re eligible. But legitimate companies won’t guarantee scholarships or grants, according to the FTC.

King recommends that students and parents can save money by doing the legwork themselves.

“Avoid companies that state they will do the work for you,” King said. “Scholarships are work. No one else can do it for you. Try to avoid any company that states it will do the work for you.”

Backlnks:
http://levicrisp05.deviantart.com/art/Oakmere-Road-Workshop-helps-seniors-avoid-scams-632854928
http://www.magcloud.com/browse/issue/1161145
Joseph Shackleton likes this.
anthony evans
Oakmere Road: Workshop helps seniors avoid scams

From telemarketing scams to identity theft, fake check scams and business fraud, senior citizens lose an estimated $3 billion annually — a 12 percent increase from 2008, Tim Summers, the state director of AARP Montana, said last week.

In an attempt to help prevent what Summers called "epidemic" fraud, dozens of people showed up at the downtown Holiday Inn in Missoula to watch the American Association of Retired Persons' presentation on outsmarting con artists.

The presentation, which largely focused on “keeping sharp,” included lectures from several experts, and dozens of brochures packed with information.

Montana Attorney General Tim Fox was one of those experts.

“I always like talking with Montana’s senior citizens,” Fox said to an audience largely made up of that demographic. “And you’re a very savvy group. But somehow, one in every four seniors in Montana have been successfully scammed.”

Fox said in today’s digital world, it’s easier than ever to be scammed, especially for those who aren’t necessarily accustomed to using technology. The key to preventing fraud, Fox said, is equipping seniors with the knowledge of how to identify it as it’s happening.

Fox talked specifically about the tricks con artists use while scamming, including their ability to change caller ID using voice-over-Internet-phones. With this kind of technology, Fox said, con artists can made it look like they’re calling from legitimate businesses, or even federal agencies such as the IRS and the FBI.

“Why do the phone companies let this happen?” a man asked from the audience.

Fox explained that voice-over-Internet-phones are extremely difficult to trace and in most cases, law enforcement — let alone phone companies — can’t even track down the scammers.

Fox also added that scams can happen anywhere, including over the phone, at your door and on the Internet. And the scammers are merciless.

One senior was told over the phone that he'd won thousands of dollars, in return for making small payments, Fox said. The man's wife had just died of cancer and he wanted a new start. Over the course of several months, the man lost $75,000.

Another woman with dementia was scammed out of thousands.

Some women were even scammed through an online dating site. The con artist used Tim Fox’s photo on the site, telling the women he was starting a business and needed money. Collectively, the women sent the man more than $150,000. Authorities were able to track the man down and prosecute him, a rare case.

“When my wife heard people were scammed using my photo on a dating site my wife said, ‘I don’t know what those girls saw in him,’” Fox said with a laugh. “But really, scam can happen to anyone. It doesn’t matter who you are, what education you’ve had or how old you are.”

Fox said he knows what it’s like to be getting older and more out of touch with technology. The audience applauded when Fox said he’d be turning 59 soon.
“Oh, he’s just a kid,” a woman laughed as she clapped.

Next up was state Auditor Monica Lindeen, who serves as commissioner of securities and insurance. She talked about the other ways scams can happen — with people you trust.

Lindeen said part of her job is to check on Montana’s financial advisors, to ensure that they aren’t pulling Ponzi schemes, a form of fraud in which people are tricked into investing in a nonexistent enterprises.

“Ninety-nine percent of our financial advisors in town do a really good job for their consumers,” Lindeen said. “But there are always bad apples. And before I had this job, I knew there were bad apples trying to take our hard- earned money, but I had no idea how many there were.”

Backlnks:
https://medium.com/@hattertion85/oakmere-road-forex-hoster-review-is-forexhoster-vps-scam-does-it-work-211ebed2c86e#.5tb26qc2v
http://www.magcloud.com/browse/issue/1160690
anthony evans likes this.
Jaxon Laurantus
Oakmere Road: How first-year college students can avoid being victims of scammers

First-year college students go through a lot of growing pains as they face new challenges and opportunities. As they figure out which major to choose, learn how to juggle work and school and just live on their own for the first time, scam artists lie in wait hoping the students make a mistake.

First-year college students are exposed to all kinds of new possibilities, which make them vulnerable to scam artists who make attempts to take advantage of their lack of life experiences.

BBB sheds some light on the following scams, which target those attending college:

Accommodation scams: Rental owners are supposedly governed by strict controls over the conditions in which they maintain their properties. However, there are unscrupulous landlords who don’t play by the rules. You want to make sure you actually go to the property before putting any money down, and make sure you’re getting what you expected.

Non-existent rentals: They take your downpayment, and when you arrive, the person you gave the money to doesn’t even own the property, or the property doesn’t exist. Before providing any form of payment, visit the property and research the property management company by going to bbb.org.

Finding a place to work: If the job you’re looking at involves door-to-door selling, such as selling magazines, cleaning supplies, handyman work or even raising money for charity, you want to make sure you check the company out before you begin working for them. In some cases, the product doesn’t exist, the charity is bogus or the handyman really doesn’t do the work you’re selling, which means you’re not likely going to get paid.

Fake initial checks: Steer clear from any job that sends you a check to deposit, then wants you to wire funds or put funds to a prepaid card. The problem is, the check is fake or it might be a forged check from an actual bank account (but not from the company on the check), and you could be charged with money laundering if you cash it.

Paying for school: Be on the lookout for phony scholarships and grants. These people are just trying to get your account information to wipe it out, not to deposit money for school as they claim.

Paying for anything: Some identity thieves set up fake credit card application booths luring students to give away very personal information in exchange for a T-shirt or an umbrella or something like that. It’s basically an easy way to steal information. If you want to get a credit card, go to the bank and apply for one.

Unsecured Wi-Fi hotspot: Using Wi-Fi on an unsecured network puts you at risk for identity theft. A lot of students use public places to study. Make sure you use encryption software and password protection to block identity thieves when doing homework in these Wi-Fi hotspots, and do not log onto your bank account or other sites that contain personal information.

For more tips on how to be a savvy consumer, go to bbb.org. To report fraudulent activity or unscrupulous business practices, please call the BBB Hotline: 903-581-8373 or use BBB Scam Tracker.

Backlnks:
https://medium.com/@hattertion85/oakmere-road-forex-hoster-review-is-forexhoster-vps-scam-does-it-work-211ebed2c86e#.5tb26qc2v
http://www.magcloud.com/browse/issue/1157893
Jaxon Laurantus likes this.
Raymond Towner
Oakmere Road: Forex Hoster Review - Is ForexHoster VPS Scam? Does It Work?

Is the Forex Hoster VPS a scam? This is a service that allows users to upload their own Forex scripts, indicators and especially Expert Advisors that they want to run 24/7. FX Hoster hosts the back end that users have access to in order to upload these files.

Forex Hoster is a Forex Vps MetaTrader & Expert Advisor Hosting for Forex Traders. This gives you the ability to view, manage and trade in real-time through your broker, and host live or demo Expert Advisors. Forex Hoster servers are part of a larger grid, that uses various and accurate management systems to make sure that each client has access to the Internet, and is up and running as needed. Free expert advice is assigned to you once you sign up for an account.

Advantages of Hosting Forex Expert Advisors on a Virtual Private Server like Forex Hoster

Since the FX Hoster is 100% Unix based and does not use Windows technology, it is immune to the spyware, malware and viruses that will infect Microsoft environment systems. This independence of Microsoft systems by the software means that I am assured that my trading activities will have no chance of being negatively sabotaged by these viruses and malware.

Generally, when I use a Forex trading robot, I want to ensure that my robot can run as smoothly as possible and eliminate the chances of interrupting it, and you should do this too if you are using Forex Expert Advisors.

The Importance Of Connectivity

The reality is that many of the newer Expert Advisors such as PipZu and Forex Detector are making use of trend adapting technology. This means that they really do need a 24 hour connection to the markets so that they can properly analyse the trends and trade at the right times.

The fact is, switching your computer off, or, worse, having it crash on you, could leave you with stuck open positions or inadequate analysis - costing you money. Forex Hoster removes this risk.

Complete Domain / IP Management

Forex Hoster does not depend on any co-location or hosting company. Therefore its connector is capable of changing locations dynamically to follow the FX Hoster to where it is located at.

What Types of OS Can Forex Hoster Support?

It has multi operating system supports that works with Windows, Linux and Mac operating systems and is able to host Forex trading platforms like MetaTrader. I am using this service today as it is the best solution for me to run my Expert Advisor by keeping my MT4 platform running consistently.

Final Overview of the Forex Hoster VPS Service

With all the safety and powerful features that FX Hoster has provided me with, I must say that the membership fee for joining has been well worth the money, and I highly recommend Forex robot users to try it.

Backlnks:
http://imgfave.com/view/7395531
Raymond Towner likes this.
Laurenz Risseeuw
Oakmere Road: 5 Signs That Your Investment Adviser Is Scamming You

When it comes to investing, there are precious few certainties, other than the fact that nobody works for your financial best interest as completely as you do.

That fact became obvious to the clients of the Warrenville, Ill., company Capital Management Associates recently when the SEC brought a suit against the father-and-son team that run it for "cherry picking" trades.

We'll get back to that story in a moment. But it's important for everyone to know that even the ethical players in the financial industry earn their living based on the fees they get directly from you or via the providers of products they recommend to help you achieve your goals.

In addition, because financial management is somewhat complicated and the future is never guaranteed, it's an industry rife with opportunities for fraud and theft. That's especially a risk when people turn over complete control of their hard-earned cash to an "expert" who promises to manage it for them.

If you suspect that your financial adviser may be scamming you, here are five signs that can help you uncover it.

Sign No. 1: An Adviser Won't Provide Real-Time Trading Information.

In the case against Capital Management Associates, the SEC alleges that the duo ran trades without specifying whether they were for clients' accounts or for the owners' accounts. Then, once the profitability or loss of the trade was assured, the company would backdate that information, assigning the profitable trades for themselves and the losers to clients.

Losing money in an investment is not a crime, but cherry-picking among winning and losing trades after the fact is.

How could clients of Capital Management Associates have known that they were getting saddled with the bad trades? The short answer is: by staying in the loop.

Those who trust their adviser to trade on their behalf should, at the very least, insist on receiving a running total of all trades when they are made. If your financial adviser can't or won't do that for you, then chances are pretty good that you're being scammed.

Sign No. 2: An Adviser's Returns Are Too Good to Be True.

Bernie Madoff swindled investors out of billions of dollars in what has been called the largest Ponzi scheme ever uncovered. While Madoff, a former chairman of the Nasdaq stock exchange and securities representative on SEC industry panels, knew enough to hide from the regulators for decades, his returns were too consistent to be real.

Sponsored Links Any time an investment advisor is guaranteeing returns or assuring consistency, year in and year out, there's a pretty good chance it's a scam. And while there are a few legitimate annuities with investment accounts structured in a way to "guarantee" you won't lose money, they're generally just high-cost insurance plans where you're paying dearly for those guarantees through the structure of the deal.

Sign No. 3: You're Getting Hot Tips That You're Told You Need to Act on Now.

Any legitimate investment worth owning will still be available tomorrow, after you've had the time to think about it (and research it independently). Any pushy advisor telling you things like, "You've got to act today to get in on the ground floor" or "You don't have time to read the paperwork" is asking you to act without reviewing something, which is a common hallmark of a scam.

Backlinks:
https://www.evernote.com/shard/s632/sh/1a8f8060-553e-45fc-a6c2-98efde2c7d65/1796589c22db1fd572ee9c9fd9e7f932
http://www.kiwibox.com/marklabelle/blog/entry/137250721/oakmere-road-5-signs-that-your-investment-adviser-is-scam/
Laurenz Risseeuw likes this.
Laurenz Risseeuw
Created by Laurenz Risseeuw

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