Calcium chloride and tricalcium phosphate effects on the pink color defect in cooked ground and intact turkey breast

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Abstract

Calcium chloride (250, 500 ppm) was examined for its ability to reduce the pink color defect induced by sodium nitrite (10 ppm) and nicotinamide (1.0%) in cooked ground turkey in the presence and absence of sodium tripolyphosphate (0.25, 0.5%) and sodium citrate (0.5, 1.0%). The ability of tricalcium phosphate (0.1-0.5%) to reduce pink cooked color also was evaluated in ground turkey and both calcium chloride and tricalcium phosphate were tested for their effects on pink cooked color in whole breast muscle. The combination of calcium chloride and sodium tripolyphosphate, not calcium chloride alone, was necessary for a reduction in pink cooked color induced by nicotinamide. Subsequently, in the presence of phosphate, both calcium chloride and sodium citrate reduced pink cooked color and were most effective in combination. Tricalcium phosphate also was capable of reducing pink cooked color in ground turkey, however substituting tricalcium phosphate for sodium tripolyphosphate resulted in lower pH and cooking yields. Neither calcium chloride nor tricalcium phosphate was capable of reducing pink cooked color in whole turkey breast. Currently, a combination of sodium tripolyphosphate, calcium chloride, and sodium citrate represents the most suitable means for reducing or preventing the pink color defect in uncured ground turkey. © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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Sammel, L. M., & Claus, J. R. (2007). Calcium chloride and tricalcium phosphate effects on the pink color defect in cooked ground and intact turkey breast. Meat Science, 77(4), 492–498. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.meatsci.2007.04.025

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