Charge retention effect in metal-oxide-semiconductor structure containing Si nanocrystals prepared by ion-beam-assisted electron beam deposition

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Abstract

An amorphous Si layer prepared by ion-beam-assisted electron beam deposition (IBAED) method is oxidized by a rapid thermal oxidation technique. We observe a nanocrystal band located at about 4 nm from the Si/SiOx interface by cross-sectional transmission electron microscope observation. The metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structure employing the oxide layer with the nanocrystal band exhibits a large capacitance-voltage hysteresis indicative of trapping of electrons/holes. In contrast, a relatively small capacitance-voltage hysteresis is found for the MOS diode prepared by conventional electron beam deposition (EBD) without ion-beam assistance. Such a marked difference shows that the ion-beam irradiation plays an important role in the formation of nuclei, which would grow to nanocrystals during subsequent rapid thermal oxidation process. Interestingly, the MOS prepared by IBAED shows a characteristic capacitance transient behavior, indicative of non-dispersive carrier relaxation. In addition, the charge retention times shows a bias dependence and a maximum of 72 s near the mid-gap voltage. Such a bias-dependent retention time is interpreted in terms of the tunneling of trapped charges in nanocrystals through empty interface states. © 2001 Elsevier Science B.V.

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Kim, Y., Park, K. H., Choi, W. C., Chung, T. H., Bark, H. J., Yi, J. Y., & Jeong, J. (2001). Charge retention effect in metal-oxide-semiconductor structure containing Si nanocrystals prepared by ion-beam-assisted electron beam deposition. Materials Science and Engineering B: Solid-State Materials for Advanced Technology, 83(1–3), 145–151. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0921-5107(01)00510-4

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