Cholinergic and noradrenergic denervations decrease labelled purine release from electrically stimulated rat cortical slices

10Citations
Citations of this article
4Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.
Get full text

Abstract

The origin of cortical purine release was investigated by measuring [3H]purine release from electrically stimulated cortical slices of rats after neurotoxic lesions of cholinergic, noradrenergic and serotoninergic pathways innervating the cortex. Purines were labelled by incubating the cortical slices with [3H]adenine. The 3H efflux at rest and during stimulation, analysed by high performance liquid chromatography, consisted of adenosine, inosine, hypoxanthine and a small amount of nucleotides. Twenty days after unilateral or bilateral lesion of the nucleus basalis a marked decrease in choline acetyltransferase activity was associated with a decrease in [3H]purine release. A linear relationship was found between the decrease in choline acetyltransferase activity and [3H]purine release. A partial recovery in both choline acetyltransferase activity and [3H]purine release was observed eight months after the lesion. Twenty days after intra-cerebroventricular injection of 6-hydroxydopamine a 59% decrease in cortical noradrenaline content was associated with a 44% decrease in [3H]purine release. Conversely, no change in [3H]purine release was found in rats in which a 89% decrease in cortical serotonin content was induced by intra-cerebroventricular injection of 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine. The decrease in [3H]purine release after the lesion of the cholinergic and noradrenergic pathways may depend on metabolic changes, a loss of a stimulating influence of acetylcholine and noradrenaline or may indicate a release of [3H]purine from cholinergic and noradrenergic fibres. © 1989.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Pedata, F., Di Patre, P. L., Giovannini, M. G., Pazzagli, M., & Pepeu, G. (1989). Cholinergic and noradrenergic denervations decrease labelled purine release from electrically stimulated rat cortical slices. Neuroscience, 32(3), 629–636. https://doi.org/10.1016/0306-4522(89)90284-4

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free