Cold increases and warmth diminishes stress-induced rise of colonic temperature in rats

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Abstract

It is generally believed that the rise of core temperature of rats induced by handling is due to a shift of set-point temperature as in fever. Changes in core temperature due to set-point shifts should not be affected by changes in the ambient temperature. Nevertheless, when the colonic temperature of rats was taken in a cold environment the usual emotional rise was higher and when the colonic temperature was taken in a warm environment the emotional rise was lower. These results contradict the hypothesis that the emotionally induced rise in temperature of rats is a fever. © 1992.

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Briese, E. (1992). Cold increases and warmth diminishes stress-induced rise of colonic temperature in rats. Physiology and Behavior, 51(4), 881–883. https://doi.org/10.1016/0031-9384(92)90130-T

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