Concanavalin A induces a cytoskeletal association of T200 molecules in T lymphocytes

3Citations
Citations of this article
4Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.
Get full text

Abstract

A recent report indicated that T200 molecules interact with elements of the cytoskeleton in BW5147 T lymphoma cells. We have confirmed the cytoskeletal association of T200 by examining nonionic detergent-soluble and detergent-insoluble fractions of murine T cell tumor cell lines, cloned cytotoxic T lymphocyte lines, and thymocytes. Concanavalin A (Con A)-treated and untreated cells were extracted with 0.5% Triton X-100 and the remaining insoluble material was extracted under conditions allowing actin depolymerization. In the absence of Con A treatment, little T200 could be recovered from the depolymerized insoluble fraction. However, in T cells treated with capping concentrations of Con A, a considerable amount of T200 was rendered insoluble in nonionic detergent, and T200 could be recovered from the insoluble fraction by a buffer which dissociates actin polymers. A lesser, but still significant, amount of T200 associated with the detergent-insoluble fraction of thymocytes treated with concentrations of Con A and succinyl Con A, which are mitogenic for T cells. We also found that in T cells treated with mitogenic concentrations of succinyl Con A, more T200 associated with cytoskeleton than did H-2 or LFA-1 molecules. Because T200 is such a predominant molecule on the surface of T cells, such translocations of the molecule may have a major impact on the physiology of the cell, especially if T200 functions as a protein tyrosine phosphatase as recent evidence by others suggests. © 1989.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Taffs, R. E., & Ewald, S. J. (1989). Concanavalin A induces a cytoskeletal association of T200 molecules in T lymphocytes. Molecular Immunology, 26(10), 925–937. https://doi.org/10.1016/0161-5890(89)90111-9

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free