Dynamics, migration and growth of Nassarius reticulatus (Mollusca: Prosobranchia) colonizing saline Lake Grevelingen (SW Netherlands)

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Abstract

The marine snail Nassarius reticulatus colonized Lake Grevelingen after its creation in 1971. A population explosion took place in 1976. Dynamics, growth and biomass development were studied during 1976 and 1977. One generation a year was observed, with 1976 settlement around August 1. Densities at a 12 m deep station were mostly below 10 m-2, at two shallow (1 m) stations numbers increased to 40 to 60 m-2, as a result of immigration. Numbers at two 3 m stations, with peak values of 200 m-2, showed a cyclic pattern with a minimum in July 1977 due to migratory movements. Biomass increased over the period of investigation. A lowest maximum biomass was found at 12 m (0.16 g ADW m-2) and a highest of 5.0 g at a 3 m station. The lake average in April 1977 amounted to a value between 1.2 and 2.1 g ADW m-2. In this survey the dominant 1976 year class showed a gradual decline from ∼ 300 ind·m-2 between 2 and 3.5 m to ∼ 60 m-2 in water deeper than 10 m. Growth rates were also depth dependent. Within the range of 2 to 25 m juveniles born in 1976 showed a maximum mean size of 6.8 mm after one growing season at 5 to 6 m depth against only 3.6 mm in deep water. Highest mean values after 2 growing-seasons, viz. 16 mm, were reached at the 1 m deep stations, which figure might be inflated by size-dependent immigration. Growth was poor (8 mm) at the 12 m station. Growth rates are similar to Swedish observations, but were reached at 10 to 50 times higher densities in Lake Grevelingen. © 1984.

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APA

Lambeck, R. H. D. (1984). Dynamics, migration and growth of Nassarius reticulatus (Mollusca: Prosobranchia) colonizing saline Lake Grevelingen (SW Netherlands). Netherlands Journal of Sea Research. https://doi.org/10.1016/0077-7579(84)90012-7

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