The effects of cortical ablation on d-amphetamine-induced changes in striatal dopamine turnover and ascorbic acid catabolism in the rat

  • Desole M
  • Miele M
  • Enrico P
 et al. 
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Abstract

Dopamine (DA). 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), ascorbic acid (AA) and dehydroascorbic acid (DHAA) levels were determined by HPLC in the striatal synaptosomal fraction and in the whole striatum of rats, whose fronto-parietal cortex had been bilaterally ablated, after a single injection of d-amphetamine (2.0 mg/kg i.p.). d-Amphetamine significantly increased the DHAA/AA ratio in unoperated and sham-operated rats, but failed to increase it in ablated rats, as compared to pertinent saline-treated groups. In the synaptosomal fraction, d-amphetamine significantly decreased the DHAA/AA ratio in unoperated, sham-operated and ablated rats. d-Amphetamine significantly decreased the DOPAC/DA ratio in the whole striatum and significantly increased it in the striatal synaptosomal fraction in all experimental groups. Cortical ablation greatly increased d-amphetamine-induced motor hyperactivity. We conclude that the d-amphetamine-induced increase in AA striatal oxidation requires integrity of the cortico-striatal glutamatergic pathways. Further, AA oxidation occurs in the extracellular space. The cortico-striatal glutamatergic pathways exert an inhibitory modulation on d-amphetamine behavioral effects. © 1992.

Author-supplied keywords

  • Ascorbic acid catabolism
  • Behavior
  • Corticostriatal pathway
  • Dopamine turnover
  • d-Amphetamine

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Authors

  • M. S. Desole

  • M. Miele

  • P. Enrico

  • L. Fresu

  • G. Esposito

  • G. De Natale

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