Metal-induced alteration of the cell membrane/cytoplasm complex studied by flow cytometry and detergent lysis

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Abstract

Flow cytometric analysis of the cell cycle is most effectively accomplished with membrane-/cytoplasm-free ("clean") nuclei. Non-ionic detergents (e.g. NP40 or Triton X-100) commonly are employed to solubilize cell membranes/cytoplasm to produce "clean" nuclei. Treatment of murine erythroleukemic cells (MELC) with tri-n-butyltin methoxide, cadmium acetate, zinc sulfate, or lead acetate alters the properties of the cell membrane/cytoplasm complex making it resistant to NP40 dissolution. On a molar basis, the organotin compound was more effective in inducing resistance to detergent-mediated dissolution than the inorganic metal compounds. Resistance to NP40-mediated dissolution was manifested as an increase in the flow cytometric parameters 90° scatter fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) fluorescence and was confirmed by light microscopy. © 1988.

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Zucker, R. M., Elstein, K. H., Easterling, R. E., & Massaro, E. J. (1988). Metal-induced alteration of the cell membrane/cytoplasm complex studied by flow cytometry and detergent lysis. Toxicology, 53(1), 69–78. https://doi.org/10.1016/0300-483X(88)90237-5

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