Some effects of early starvation on the survival and development of barnacle nauplii, Balanus improvisus (Darwin)

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Abstract

Newly hatched stage I-II nauplii of Balanus improvisus (Darwin) were "totally starved" (until death) or "partially starved" for the first 48 h and 96 h of their development. Daily mortality and molting were monitored throughout larval development in both starved and fed control groups. Fed control animals exhibited a largely synchronous molting pattern with instars of equal duration. Total starvation suppressed molting beyond stage II; 50% mortality occurred in ≈4 days at both 15 and 21 °C, while longest survival time was 7 days at 15 °C and 6 days at 21 °C. At 15 °C, partially starved nauplii retained the ability to complete naupliar development but at a slower overall rate and with increased mortality relative to controls. These effects were more pronounced in the 96-h group. Increased mortality of stage VI nauplii was evident in both partially starved groups (7.1% for 48 h, 18.8% for 96 h) relative to unstarved controls (3.1%). Stage II nauplii exhibited little resistance to starvation and survival potential may have decreased as soon as 24 h. © 1982.

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Lang, W. H., & Marcy, M. (1982). Some effects of early starvation on the survival and development of barnacle nauplii, Balanus improvisus (Darwin). Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, 60(1), 63–70. https://doi.org/10.1016/0022-0981(81)90180-5

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