Source and role of diacylglycerol formed during phagocytosis of opsonized yeast particles and associated respiratory burst in human neutrophils

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Abstract

The results presented in this paper demonstrate that in human neutrophils phagocytosis of C3b bi and IgG-opsonized yeast particles is associated with activation of phospholipase D and that this reaction is the main source of diglycerides. The demonstration is based upon the following findings: 1) the challenge of neutrophils with these opsonized particles was followed by a rapid formation of [3H]alkyl-phosphatidic acid ([3H]alkyl-PA) and [3H]alkyl-diglyceride ([3H]alkyl-DG) in cells labeled with [3H]alkyl-lyso-phosphatidylcholine; 2) in the presence of ethanol [3H]alkyl-phosphatidylethanol was formed, and accumulation of [3H]alkyl-PA and [3H]alkyl-DG was depressed; 3) propranolol, by inhibiting the dephosphorylation of [3H]alkyl-PA, completely inhibited the accumulation of [3H]alkyl-DG and depressed by about 75% the formation of diglyceride mass. Evidence is also presented that phagocytosis of C3b bi and IgG-opsonized yeast particles and associated respiratory burst can take place independently of diglyceride formation and of the activity of this second messenger on protein kinase C. In fact: a) propranolol while completely inhibited the formation of diglyceride mass did not modify either the phagocytosis or respiratory burst; b) these two processes were insensitive to staurosporine. © 1991.

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Della Bianca, V., Grzeskowiak, M., Lissandrini, D., & Rossi, F. (1991). Source and role of diacylglycerol formed during phagocytosis of opsonized yeast particles and associated respiratory burst in human neutrophils. Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, 177(3), 948–955. https://doi.org/10.1016/0006-291X(91)90630-P

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