Stimulatory effect of zinc-chelating dipeptide on deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis in osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells

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Abstract

Whether deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis in osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells is stimulated by zinc, an activator of bone formation, was investigated in vitro. After subculture for 3 days, the cells were cultured for up to 3 days (72 h) with zinc sulfate or zinc-chelated dipeptide (β-alanyl-L-histidinato zinc; AHZ) in the range of 10-7to 10-5M. The culture with zinc compounds (10-5M) produced a significant increase of cell number, DNA content, and protein concentration in the cells, as reported previously. The culture with zinc compounds (10-6and 10-5M) clearly stimulated DNA synthesis in the homogenate, when it was estimated by the incorporation of [3H]deoxythymidine 5'-triphosphate into the DNA in the homogenate of cells. The AHZ effect was greater than that of zinc sulfate. The culture together with cycloheximide (19-6M) completely abolished the zinc compounds (10-5M)-induced increase of DNA synthesis in the cells, suggesting that the zinc compound effect is based on a newly synthesized protein component. Moreover, when zinc sulfate (10-7and 10-6M) or AHZ (10-8to 10-5M) was added into the reaction mixture with the homogenate of cells cultured without zinc compounds, the DNA synthesis was clearly increased. The effect of addition of zinc compounds (10-6M) on the DNA synthesis was completely inhibited by the presence of staurosporine (10-8M), an inhibitor of protein kinase C, or okadaic acid (10-7M), an inhibitor of protein phosphatase. The present study demonstrates that zinc compounds have a stimulatory effect on DNA synthesis in osteoblastic cells.

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Yamaguchi, M., & Matsui, T. (1996). Stimulatory effect of zinc-chelating dipeptide on deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis in osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells. Peptides, 17(7), 1207–1211. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0196-9781(96)00114-3

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