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Andrew Milne

  • Dr
  • Senior Research Fellow
  • The MARCS Institute, Western Sydney University
  • 8h-indexImpact measure calculated using publication and citation counts. Updated daily.
  • 124CitationsNumber of citations received by Andrew's publications. Updated daily.

Editorships

Musicae Scientiae

Editorial Board member

2016 - Present

Recent publications

  • Evaluation of the Learnability and Playability of Pitch Layouts in New Musical Instruments

    • Macritchie J
    • Milne A
    N/AReaders
    N/ACitations
  • XronoMorph: Algorithmic Generation of Perfectly Balanced and Well-Formed Rhythms

    • Milne A
    • Herff S
    • Bulger D
    • et al.
    N/AReaders
    N/ACitations

Professional experience

Senior Research Fellow

The MARCS Institute, Western Sydney University

January 2018 - Present

Research Fellow

The MARCS Institute, Western Sydney University

November 2013 - December 2017(4 years)

Education

PhD

The Open University

October 2009 - July 2013(4 years)

MA (Music, Mind and Technology)

University of Jyväskylä

September 2007 - June 2009(2 years)

BA(Hons) (Fine Art)

Sheffield Hallam University

September 1985 - July 1988(3 years)

About

I am a Senior Research Fellow in Music Cognition and Computation at the MARCS Institute for Brain, Behaviour and Development, Western Sydney University. As a member of the Music Cognition and Action research group, I develop computational models of music perception/cognition, and use these models to drive creative musical outputs and to inform the development of educational tools. I joined the MARCS Institute as a postdoctoral research fellow in late 2013, shortly after completing my PhD in Computational Musicology at The Open University, UK. In 2016, I won an ARC DECRA award ($369,000) for a three-year research project entitled “Uncovering Universal Mechanisms for the Communication of Musical Emotion.” My current research focus is on tonality and meter; for example, using perceptual and cognitive processes to explain why differing successions of chords induce differing feelings of expectation and resolution. My research also engages with new musical interfaces, including the algorithmic generation of music, as exemplified by my suite of free music applications available at the Dynamic Tonality website, which includes the widely used musical loop generator XronoMorph.

Groups

Co-authors (25)

  • Gopal Roy
  • Emily Emily
  • Manuel Anglada-Tort
  • Stefanie Acevedo
  • Tristan Reinhardt
  • Utsuk Shrestha