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Jake Rogers

  • PhD MSc BSc
  • Rutherford Fellow in Neurotechnology
  • Imperial College London
  • 4h-indexImpact measure calculated using publication and citation counts. Updated daily.
  • 46CitationsNumber of citations received by Jake's publications. Updated daily.

Recent publications

  • Elevated paternal glucocorticoid exposure modifies memory retention in female offspring

    • Yeshurun S
    • Rogers J
    • Short A
    • et al.
    N/AReaders
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  • Gene-environment interactions informing therapeutic approaches to cognitive and affective disorders

    • Rogers J
    • Renoir T
    • Hannan A
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Professional experience

Rutherford Fellow in Neurotechnology

Imperial College London

April 2018 - Present

PhD

Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health

March 2013 - April 2018(5 years)

Education

PhD

University of Melbourne

March 2013 - April 2018(5 years)

Masters of Science

Swinburne University of Technology

March 2011 - November 2012(2 years)

Bachelor of Science

Mount Allison University

September 1999 - May 2003(4 years)

About

The hippocampus plays an integral role in learning and memory processes, especially those underpinning spatial navigation. Optical imaging of hippocampal neuronal activity in behaving mice allows investigation of the underlying neural correlates. Using a hippocampal window preparation and genetically encoded calcium indicators, we are capable of imaging place cells at cellular resolution in awake mobile animals using 2-photon calcium imaging in head restrained animals capable of in vivo navigation in a flat real-world environment. This combination of live imaging and physiological recording in tandem with complex behavioural readouts using a floating maze setup is ideal for testing place cell activity in the hippocampus. Place cell activity is crucial for the formation of a cognitive map of space during spatial navigation by rodents and is therefore a reliable indicator of the ability to form a spatial memory of an arena. Clinically, memory loss is a core symptom of Alzheimer’s disease progression. Therefore, we will utilize transgenic models of Alzheimer’s disease (APP23, J20 and 5xFAD mice) and measure place cell activity as an indicator of the ability to form spatial memory in those animal models. The project aim is to demonstrate two-photon calcium imaging of place cells in the hippocampus of awake Alzheimer’s-model mice navigating in real-world floating environment.

Co-authors (13)

  • Shlomo Yeshurun