Skip to content

Lee Kalcsits

  • Postdoctoral Fellow - Tree Ecophysiology
  • Postdoctoral Fellow
  • University of Victoria
  • 4PublicationsNumber of items in Lee's My Publications folder on Mendeley.

Recent publications

  • Magnetic resonance microimaging indicates water diffusion correlates with dormancy induction in cultured hybrid poplar (Populus spp.) buds.

    • Kalcsits L
    • Kendall E
    • Silim S
    • et al.
    N/AReaders
    N/ACitations
    Get full text
  • Warm temperature accelerates short photoperiod-induced growth cessation and dormancy induction in hybrid poplar (Populus × spp.)

    • Kalcsits L
    • Silim S
    • Tanino K
    N/AReaders
    N/ACitations
    Get full text

Professional experience

Postdoctoral Fellow

University of Victoria

July 2013 - Present

Research Assistant

Department of Forest Sciences, University of British Columbia

September 2008 - May 2013(5 years)

Teaching Assistant

Department of Forest Sciences, University of British Columbia

September 2009 - December 2012(3 years)

Teaching Assistant

Department of Plant Sciences, University of Saskatchewan

September 2006 - December 2007(a year)

Research Assistant

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

December 2005 - December 2007(2 years)

Research Assistant

Department of Plant Sciences, University of Saskatchewan

September 2004 - December 2005(a year)

Education

PhD Candidate

September 2008 - Present

M.Sc.

University of Saskatchewan

September 2005 - December 2007(2 years)

B.S.A.

University of Saskatchewan

September 2001 - April 2005(4 years)

About

Currently, my Ph.D. research is focused on testing the use of nitrogen isotope discrimination as a predictor of nitrogen fluxes, partitioning and assimilation in balsam poplar. From this, I hope to improve on the ability to identify intraspecific variation in nitrogen-use traits in plants. On a broader scale, my research addresses environmental influence on tree physiology. My research interests include improving plant nitrogen-use efficiency, agriculture, horticulture and ecophysiology.