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Lillian Tuttle

  • Postdoctoral Researcher
  • University of Hawai'i at Manoa Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology
  • 5h-indexImpact measure calculated using publication and citation counts. Updated daily.
  • 59CitationsNumber of citations received by Lillian's publications. Updated daily.

Recent publications

  • Behavioral Tracking and Neuromast Imaging of Mexican Cavefish

    • Worsham M
    • Fernandes V
    • Settle A
    • et al.
    N/AReaders
    N/ACitations
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  • Resolving differences in observed impacts of invasive lionfish and clarifying advice to managers

    • Ingeman, K.E., M.A. Albins, C.E. Benkwitt, S.J. Green, T.K. Kindinger, L.J. Tuttle A
    N/AReaders
    N/ACitations
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Professional experience

Postdoctoral Researcher

University of Hawai'i at Manoa Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology

January 2019 - Present

Postdoctoral Researcher

University of Hawai'i at Manoa Pacific Biosciences Research Center

July 2017 - January 2019(2 years)

Postdoctoral Researcher

University of Hawai'i at Manoa Department of Biology

September 2016 - June 2017(9 months)

NSF Graduate Research Fellow

Department of Zoology, Oregon State University

September 2010 - June 2016(6 years)

Fulbright Advanced Student

Université Montpellier 2 and CIRAD

September 2008 - June 2009(9 months)

Education

PhD

Oregon State University

August 2010 - June 2016(6 years)

BS

Centre College

September 2004 - May 2008(4 years)

About

http://lillianjtuttle.com Broadly, I work in the fields of behavioral ecology and evolution, community ecology, invasion biology, and conservation. I recently began a postdoctoral research position with Dr. Masato Yoshizawa at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa. I will use animal behavior and quantitative genetics to resolve mechanisms by which the environment shapes the evolution of the brain. Our model system is the blind cavefish (Astyanax mexicanus). For my PhD, I designed and conducted field and lab experiments that investigated how invasive red lionfish interact with fish macroparasites and cleaning mutualisms native to Atlantic coral reefs. My advisor was Dr. Mark Hixon.

Co-authors (35)