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Sean Jungbluth

  • Computational Biologist Postdoctoral Fellow
  • DOE Joint Genome Institute
  • 8h-indexImpact measure calculated using publication and citation counts. Updated daily.
  • 200CitationsNumber of citations received by Sean's publications. Updated daily.

Recent publications

  • Characterization of benthic biogeochemistry and ecology at three methane seep sites on the Northern U.S. Atlantic margin

    • McVeigh D
    • Skarke A
    • Dekas A
    • et al.
    N/AReaders
    2Citations
    Get full text
  • Expanded diversity of microbial groups that shape the dissimilatory sulfur cycle

    • Anantharaman K
    • Hausmann B
    • Jungbluth S
    • et al.
    N/AReaders
    8Citations
    Get full text

Professional experience

Computational Biologist Postdoctoral Fellow

DOE Joint Genome Institute

February 2017 - Present

Principal

Jungbluth Consulting

November 2016 - February 2017(3 months)

Postdoctoral Research Scholar

University of Southern California

November 2015 - October 2016(a year)

Postdoctoral Research Scholar

University of Hawai'i at Manoa

September 2014 - October 2015(a year)

Research Scientist

Lucigen Corporation

August 2007 - April 2008(8 months)

Education

Ph.D.

University of Hawai'i at Manoa Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology

August 2008 - September 2014(6 years)

B.S.

University of Wisconsin at Madison

January 2004 - May 2007(3 years)

Research interests

bioinformaticsdeep biospheremicrobial diversity

About

Beginning in 2008, I have had the fortunate opportunity to work in the laboratory of Michael Rappé studying the microbiology of the deep subsurface sediment-covered oceanic basement by virtue of an NSF-funded microbial observatory awarded to UH-Manoa researchers James Cowen, Michael Rappé, and Brian Glazer. Our team of researchers has been using Ocean Drilling Program boreholes to sample fluids within the deep seafloor and explore the biology that is contained within. Working off the west coast of Washington state on the Juan de Fuca ridge in deep water (2600 meters depth), our deep biosphere sampling efforts require extensive submersible operations. Back in the laboratory, molecular tools are used to characterize various traits of the microbial communities living in Earth’s crust. Scientists have never had such an amount of sampling access to this extreme environment, so we are able to probe many questions including: who is there, what are they “eating”, how have they evolved, etc. Besides the intrinsic value of describing novel microbial diversity, understanding the nature of the deep biosphere contained within Earth's crust is critical to understanding the biogeochemical cycles relevant to global climate change.

Groups

Co-authors (169)

  • James Wilson