Acute cardiovascular effects of firefighting and active cooling during rehabilitation

  • Burgess J
  • Duncan M
  • Hu C
 et al. 
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OBJECTIVES: To determine the cardiovascular and hemostatic effects of fire suppression and postexposure active cooling. METHODS: Forty-four firefighters were evaluated before and after a 12-minute live-fire drill. Next, 50 firefighters performing the same drill were randomized to undergo postfire forearm immersion in 10 degrees C water or standard rehabilitation. RESULTS: In the first study, heart rate and core body temperature increased and serum C-reactive protein decreased but there were no significant changes in fibrinogen, sE-selectin, or sL-selectin. The second study demonstrated an increase in blood coagulability, leukocyte count, factors VIII and X, cortisol, and glucose, and a decrease in plasminogen and sP-selectin. Active cooling reduced mean core temperature, heart rate, and leukocyte count. CONCLUSIONS: Live-fire exposure increased core temperature, heart rate, coagulability, and leukocyte count; all except coagulability were reduced by active cooling.

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  • Jefferey L. Burgess

  • Michael D. Duncan

  • Chengcheng Hu

  • Sally R. Littau

  • Delayne Caseman

  • Margaret Kurzius-Spencer

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