Acute Psychological Stress Reduces Working Memory- Related Activity in the Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex

  • Qin S
  • Hermans E
  • Van Marle H
 et al. 
  • 1

    Readers

    Mendeley users who have this article in their library.
  • N/A

    Citations

    Citations of this article.

Abstract

Background: Acute psychological stress impairs higher-order cognitive function such as working memory (WM). Similar impairments are seen in various psychiatric disorders that are associated with higher susceptibility to stress and with prefrontal cortical dysfunctions, suggesting that acute stress may play a potential role in such dysfunctions. However, it remains unknown whether acute stress has immediate effects on WM-related prefrontal activity. Methods: Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we investigated neural activity of 27 healthy female participants during a blocked WM task (numerical N-back) while moderate psychological stress was induced by viewing strongly aversive (vs. neutral) movie material together with a self-referencing instruction. To assess stress manipulation, autonomic and endocrine, as well as subjective, measurements were acquired throughout the experiment. Results: Successfully induced acute stress resulted in significantly reduced WM-related activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), and was accompanied by less deactivation in brain regions that are jointly referred to as the default mode network.

Author-supplied keywords

  • Dorsolateral prefrontal cortex
  • fMRI
  • psychological stress
  • working memory

Get free article suggestions today

Mendeley saves you time finding and organizing research

Sign up here
Already have an account ?Sign in

Find this document

Authors

  • Shaozheng Qin

  • Erno J Hermans

  • Hein J F Van Marle

  • Jing Luo

  • Guillén Fernández

Cite this document

Choose a citation style from the tabs below

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free