Administrator perceptions of school improvement policies in a high-impact policy setting

  • Torres M
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Abstract

This study investigated school administrators’ perceptions of school improvement policies in a high-impact policy envi- ronment by measuring the impact of accountability, site-based management, professional development, and scheduling reform on the three dependent variables of a) academic outcomes, b) staff morale, and c) parent and community involve- ment. Using a convenience sampling method, 49 public school principals from Texas participated and an online survey was constructed to gather both quantitative (i.e., Likert scale) and qualitative (i.e., open ended response) data. The find- ings clearly point to principals, regardless of geographical district type and grade level school type, viewing less contro- versial and more intrinsically oriented policies (i.e., site-based management and professional development) as having a greater positive impact on outcomes as a whole than more radical alternatives (i.e., accountability and time and sched- ule reform). The evidence suggests that more aggressive school improvement policy approaches are likely failing to gen- erate enough convincing outcomes to generate high commitment and confidence from school leaders. Further studies may look at the interaction of policy impact with minority student enrollments and with subgroup populations

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  • M Torres

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