Advances in the conceptualization and measurement of religion and spirituality: Implications for physical and mental health research

  • Hill P
  • Pargament K
  • 62

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Abstract

This reprinted article originally appeared in American Psychologist, 2003, Vol 58[1], 64-74. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2003-02034-006.)Empirical studies have identified significant links between religion and spirituality and health. The reasons for these associations, however, are unclear. Typically, religion and spirituality have been measured by global indices (e.g., frequency of church attendance, self-rated religiousness and spirituality) that do not specify how or why religion and spirituality affect health. The authors highlight recent advances in the delineation of religion and spirituality concepts and measures theoretically and functionally connected to health. They also point to areas for growth in religion and spirituality conceptualization and measurement. Through measures of religion and spirituality more conceptually related to physical and mental health (e.g., closeness to God, religious orientation and motivation, religious support, religious struggle), psychologists are discovering more about the distinctive contributions of religiousness and spirituality to health and well-being. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)

Author-supplied keywords

  • measures
  • mental health
  • physical health
  • religiousness
  • spirituality

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Authors

  • Peter C Hill

  • Kenneth I Pargament

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